WHAT IS WHOLE HOUSE AUDIO/VIDEO? Part 2

Audio/Video

Elements from the 3 methods described previously can be combined to customize the system for your requirements (eg. use a high power surround sound receiver for your home theater zone 1, add the NUVO 6-Source/6-Zone System system for the other listening areas).

The key to a successful whole-house Audio/Video system is making it possible to control the centralized equipment from each remote listening location. Without this, you will have to run back to the equipment closet everytime you want to adjust the volume or change source. With the systems below, you can use remotes in each listening location to transmit commands back to the Audio/Video equipment, just as if you were standing in front of the Audio/Video equipment. There are several ways that this can be done:

WIRELESS RF – FOR SINGLE ZONE SYSTEMS

audio/videoThe easiest and lowest cost solution is to use wireless RF control systems. This can be done using the 8210 Powermid or 8220A IR Remote Extender. These devices convert IR signals to RF that transmit through walls back to your equipment. These devices can typically only be used for single zone systems.

 

COAX VIDEO SIGNAL TRANSMISSION

If the coax video transmission system to your TVs is laid out in the same pattern as your Audio/Video zoning, you can use this same cable to transmit IR commands back to your system. You must have a coax cable system that is home run back to the Audio/Video equipment location to do this. See 8195 IR Signal Coax Splitter/Injector8197 Xtralink 2, and 7717 Multiroom Video Distribution System. This method provides zoning capability and has better signal reliability than the RF method.

 

HARDWIRED SIGNAL TRANSMISSION

This is the preferred method for new construction and retrofitting if it is possible to easily run Cable from each zone back to your equipment. Hardwired IR signal transmission provides the greatest system design flexibility and the greatest signal transmission reliability.

 

X10 AND HOME AUTOMATION CONTROL

ComputersX10 TabletopWallmount andWireless RF transmitters can also be used to control Audio/Video equipment. For a more sophisticated control that can include macros, use an intelligent home automation controller. See 1132CUP PowerLinc Controller1350 HomeVision, or 1240 JDS TimeCommander/Stargate + 1232 IR Xpander for some of the home automation controllers and software that support IR Audio/Video control.

The use of an intelligent home automation controller opens up many amazing possibilities. One touch can turn on a complex array of Audio/Video equipment. You can simplify control of your equipment so that every member of your family can easily choose the music or video source they want without juggling a handful of remotes. Or, how about having music follow you around your home (as in Bill Gates home). Motion detectors can be used to automatically turn on music in different zones.

Check Out Part 1 of What is whole house audio/video?

Article Provided By: Smarthome

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

WHAT IS WHOLE HOUSE AUDIO/VIDEO?

Audio/Video

Imagine having hi-fi music in every room of your home with nothing more than an elegant Wall-Mounted Keypad and virtually invisible in-wall or in-ceiling Speakers showing. This is the dream system of interior decorators and is typically only found in multi-million dollar homes. We can show you how this can be done in your home with your existing equipment and at a reasonable cost.

audio/videoWhole house audio/video refers to a centralized audio/video system that pipes music and video/cable signals throughout the home. Because the system is centralized, the only components present in each room are speakers and TV screens. Control of the system is made through a handheld remote or wall mounted control panels. The centralized components can either be hidden away in a closet or if you prefer, mounted in an impressive Rack System array in your living room. (Some systems may have additional VCRs and CD players located locally in various rooms for convenience. If correctly configured, these VCRs and CD players can be viewed or listened to in the room they are located as well as any other room.)

There are many ways of configuring a whole-house Audio/Video system. We will describe the basic methods below. Choose the method that best suits your requirements and budget.

SINGLE AMPLIFIER/RECEIVER DRIVING SPEAKERS IN MULTIPLE ROOMS

This is the simplest and lowest cost method. The output from a single amplifier or receiver is split amongst several rooms. All rooms will receive the same music. Volume Controls can be located in each room to adjust listening levels (or a centralized volume controller can be used if preferred). Whenever the output from a single amp/receiver is split between 2 or more speakers, an impedance matching system must be used. To control the master volume and source (CD, tuner, tape, etc.) from each room an Infrared (IR) Distribution system can be added.

MULTIPLE AMPLIFIERS/RECEIVERS SHARING SOURCES

If different rooms need to listen to different sources at the same time, multiple amps/receivers are required. Use one amp/receiver for each listening (a zone refers to one or more rooms that listen to the same source simultaneously). The amp – receivers can be stacked together and the source inputs can be shared (ie. 1 CD, 1 tape, 1 DSS shared amongst 2 or more amp/receivers). To control the volume and source from each zone a zoned Infrared (IR) Distribution system can be added.

PURPOSE MADE MULTIPLE ZONE AMPLIFIER SYSTEMS

Many higher end amp/receivers now come with a built-in second discrete amplifier for a second zone. If your needs do not require more than 2 zones, this may be a cost effective solution. For a larger number of zones consider the NUVO 6-Source/6-Zone System which has six discrete amplifiers and a volume/source distribution system built-in.

Check Out Part 2 of this article.

Article Provided By: Smarthome

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

 

Canary Flex is a small, weatherproof security camera

Canary Flex

Canary Flex

Security cameras are slowly making their way out of your house and onto your porches and yards. Canary Flex is following the footsteps of rival Nest by launching a new, smaller weatherproof camera called the Flex that can be plugged into an outlet or powered by batteries. It’s available for pre-order today for $199 and will be in stores by the holidays. Canary is also introducing a new pricing model that is pretty different from what’s on the market, but we’ll get to that in a bit.

Rated IP65, the Canary Flex can withstand splashes of water, and thanks to the included weatherproof cord, it can remain plugged in even when it’s wet. If you’d like to go wireless, you can use the bundled rechargeable battery, which should last two to three months of average use, the company said. When it’s running on batteries, the Flex runs on a low power WiFi state to stay connected to the servers without sucking up juice, and also uses a passive infrared (PIR) sensor to detect incidents before triggering the rest of the system. Otherwise, the Flex uses the camera (or “computer vision,” as Canary called it) to monitor activity when plugged in. When triggered, the Canary Flex will record HD video to the cloud.

Unlike its predecessor, the Canary Flex is compact, and fits comfortably in your hand so you can easily move it around should you need to. It also has a magnetic base that lets it swivel 360 degrees in its companion mount. However, you’ll lack the siren that the original camera had, as well as what Canary called the home health sensors. The latter relay feedback on your house’s temperature, humidity and air quality. Those who already own the older Canary camera can use the same app with the new device, and no hub is required.

To make it easier to place the Flex around your house, Canary is also launching a series of accessories, such as a secure mount, a stake mount to stick your camera in your flower pot, and a fun twist mount to wrap your Flex around almost anything.

For those who want complete peace of mind, Canary  is also launching a 4G LTE mount with Verizon that will let your Flex switch to cellular data in the event that your WiFi network drops out. The 4G mount can be plugged in, but also has enough onboard battery to last as long as the Flex’s power pack will. This would be great for those who want to prepare for power outages. It’ll be available shortly after the Flex hits store shelves.

One of the coolest things about this launch is Canary Flex ‘s new pricing model that does away with the industry’s conventional tiers system altogether. Instead of making you pay more to store more of your footage like competitors do, Canary is letting you access the last 24 hours of your timeline for free. That’s twice the 12 hours it previously let nonpaying customers have.

The company is also removing its previous limits on features such as saving and downloading clips, as well as sending them to other contacts. Those who want more support can pay $9.99 a month for one device ($15 for two to three cameras), and that membership will come with up to $1,000 in homeowners deductible reimbursement (for qualifying incidents), as well as dedicated agents who will follow you through your your incident report process. Members also get extended warranties and access to footage from the prior 30 days.

That’s quite a big bump from the free version, and could give Canary Flex a serious edge over its competitors. Both Nest and Canary’s devices cost $199, but the latter says it is working on a more personable approach to security that could make its outgoing alerts more meaningful. Some of these upcoming improvements include refined object, people and animal recognition, as well as better understanding of new versus repetitive motions. These changes will soon roll out to the Canary app as well. In the meantime, you may want to finetune your security camera settings so you’re not getting buzzed for every time your neighbor’s dog jumps, or for random tree branches smacking against your window.

Article Provided By: engadget

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

 

Drones Doing Bad; Drones Doing Good (Part 1)

Drones

Drones Good or Bad?

A growing number of utilities, ports and stadiums though are concerned about the dark side of drones. For example, some security operations are using or considering small radar technology to alert to drone intrusions. And drones have intruded into sports stadiums and parades, peeked into windows and landed on the White House lawn.

On the other hand, experts at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business say drones are already into law enforcement and security applications. “We are missing out on a commercial opportunity that other countries have already embraced,” says Smith School professor Oliver Schlake, a drone hobbyist who challenges his MBA students to develop business applications for the technology. Hank Lucas, another Smith School professor who wrote “The Search for Survival: Lessons from Disruptive Technologies,” says the impact will be immense as more companies discover commercially viable applications for drones. “It’s well beyond our imagination,” he says.

Storm watching:Drones can fly into the eye of a hurricane or hover over an active volcano, sending back data without risking lives. Global Hawk drones developed by Northrop Grumman can monitor stormy areas for up to 30 hours, generating data not available any other way.

Search and rescue:After severe storms hit Texas and Oklahoma in May 2015, the FAA sent drones from one of its test sites to search for survivors along the Blanco River.

Security:Drones equipped with headlamps, cameras and alarms can startle intruders and records their movements – and they often can arrive at the scene faster than police or private security officers. A company with commercial security contracts in New Zealand plans to deploy the technology by the end of 2015.

Innovation and technology as applied to the security industry can, not surprisingly, be a two-edged sword. Still, the good side of that tech sword can slice through crime prevention, situational awareness, forensics and other security tasks with ease.

One example: Innovative integration through diverse software is squeezing more value out of enterprise investments in security technology that evolves from protection and into the natural workflow of an organization.

At Austin Hall in the College of Business at Oregon State University in Corvallis, a security management system (VI Connect from Vanderbilt) represents one of the most unique systems integration projects within the higher education market.

The technology seamlessly integrates building access control into a single data management solution that not only enables school officials to streamline door access, but also allows students and staff to reserve one of 21 project rooms in the facility simply by using their existing credential. In addition to the project rooms, the building also features classrooms, faculty conference rooms, IT closets, a four-room research suite, a mailroom and an assortment of event spaces.

To help manage access control at Austin Hall, which includes credentials for approximately 4,500 students each semester, Kirk Wydner, operating systems network analyst for the College of Business, and his team chose to take an innovative and integrated approach.

Part 2, Next Week

Article Provided By: Security

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

Liquid Video Technologies Has Moved

Moved

We’ve Moved

Great news for our customers, Liquid Video Technologies has just finished moving our offices from our old home in Easley South Carolina to our new home in Greenville South Carolina. We are extremely happy to be more accessible to our clients and their ends.

Now Liquid Video Technologies is faster than ever!

With the move to our new home, we have increased our ability to serve our clients with a New Server. Also, at our new location, we have a new Fiber connection provided by Charter Spectrum and we are now running at speeds of 100 megs of upload and 100 megs of download.  In just three words, our new Server is Fast–Fast–Fast! The new Server has new SSD-hard drives and significantly more ram. Our Email clients have ready commented on just how much faster their email is running.

Our new location is, 1325 Miller Road, Suited C and we are looking forward to serving our customers from this location for years to come.

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

Cost of data breaches increasing to average of $3.8 million

data breaches

Data Breaches

The cost of data breaches is rising for companies around the world as sophisticated thieves target valuable financial and medical records, according to a study released on Wednesday.

The total average cost of a data breach is now $3.8 million, up from $3.5 million a year ago, according to a study by data security research organization Ponemon Institute, paid for by International Business Machines Corp.

The direct costs include hiring experts to fix the breach, investigating the cause, setting up hotlines for customers and offering credit monitoring for victims. Business lost because customers are wary after a breach can be even greater, the study said.

Data breaches are becoming more common and significant, with high-profile attacks on Sony Corp, JPMorgan Chase and retailers Target Corp and Home Depot Inc in the past year and a half.

“Most of what’s occurring is through organized crime,” said Caleb Barlow, vice president of IBM Security. “These are well-funded groups. They work Monday to Friday. They are probably better funded and better staffed than a lot people who are trying to defend against them.”

IBM, which sells cyber-security services to companies, has a vested interest in highlighting the costs of data breaches.

The cost of a data breach is now $154 per record lost or stolen, up from $145 last year, according to the study, based on interviews with 350 companies from 11 major countries that had suffered a data breach.

The study’s authors said average costs did not apply to mega-breaches affecting millions of customers, such as those suffered by JPMorgan Chase, Target and Home Depot, which cost the companies far greater sums. Target alone said last year its breach cost $148 million.

The study found that the healthcare was most at risk for costly breaches, with an average cost per record lost or stolen as high as $363, more than twice the average for all sectors of $154.

That reflects the relatively high value of a person’s medical records on the underground market, said IBM, as Social Security information is much more useful for identity theft than simple names, addresses or credit card numbers.

Article Provided By: Reuters

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

CONTROLLER VS. CONTROLLERLESS WIFI: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

CONTROLLER VS. CONTROLLERLESS WIFI

Have you ever heard of the terms thin AP’s, fat AP’s, wifi controller, or controllerless wifi in regards to wireless? Chances are if you’ve been anywhere near the Information Technology field in the last 10 years you’ve probably heard of at least one of them.

If not, let’s break down some of these terms and talk about their place in a wireless network.

controller

Fat AP’s, or Autonomous AP’s were the first type of access points that were introduced onto the wireless market.

These were perfect for small scale wireless network solutions that needed no more than 10-15 clients per access point or were just providing “hot-spot” type of services.

These AP’s are called autonomous AP’s since they each are their own entity.

Each fat AP needs to be manually configured for the network and security settings you would want running on your network. This is a great solution if you only plan on having a few AP’s.

Any more than that just wasn’t scalable. No administrator wants to have to manually configure multiple devices – thus the need for a change.

WLAN Controllers with thin AP’s was the next evolution in WLANs that changed the face of wireless. A thin AP is simply an access point that is managed by a WLAN controller.

The WLAN controller provides the thin AP its configuration and also functions as a switch for all the wireless traffic. The WLAN controller also consolidated management for the entire wireless network in one place.

Some WLAN controllers perform functions such as a Stateful firewall between the wired/wireless networks, VPN connectivity, Intrusion Detection / Prevention services, spectrum monitoring/analysis, and much more.

WLAN controllers are physical devices that are rack mounted in the core data room and communicate with each AP at the same time.

This allows for easy and quick configuration of multiple AP’s without having to manually configure each and every one.

It also eliminates the need to re-architect your wired network to host a WLAN.

As you might assume, scalability is greatly improved by the addition of a WLAN controller as it easily allows the installation of more AP’s onto the network and reduces deployment and management complexities.

WLAN controller, controllerless wifi, wifi service providers,

Controller-less access points have been the next breakthrough recently in wireless technology.

At first you hear the word “controller-less” and you think, “Wait a second. But I like controllers!” Well don’t worry, WLAN controllers aren’t going anywhere.

Over the past few years there have been huge improvements to the technologies we use today. One of them is virtualization.

Wireless vendors now have started to implement this into their wireless products.

Because of the advancement of physical components inside access points (chipsets, memory, etc.) developers have now found a way to virtualize controller software and run it on the old “thin” AP’s themselves.

This is a huge breakthrough for wireless because it means that now multiple AP’s can still be managed from one interface without the addition of a physical rack-mounted controller.

For many clients this is a great avenue for them since physical WLAN controllers may be out of their budget or simply overkill for their needs– yet they would still like the ease of controller-based management. WLAN controller, controllerless wifi, wireless network design, wifi companies,

Primarily all wireless networks today that are in the commercial or educational environment are managed by controllers of some sort.

The IT community as a whole depends largely on secure wireless networks and does not have the luxury of configuring AP’s individually.

The introduction of the controller has streamlined and reduced the complexity of WLANs whether they are controller or controller-less based.

Article Provided By:SecurEdge

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

How to prevent potential HTTPS URL hijacking

It’s an easy fix for the consumer, but enterprise customers may need IT’s help to mitigate the risk of issues like URL hijacking

url hijacking

When a computer connects to a public Wi-Fi network or an untrusted LAN, a malicious actor could potentially compromise a browser’s HTTPS connection and eavesdrop on URLs such as Dropbox, Google Drive URLs or Password reset URLs.

The fix is easy for a consumer: un-checking the automatic detect setting. But an enterprise user might need to ask the IT department to eliminate this risk. Windows, Mac and Linux computers are all at risk.

Windows: How to reduce the risk of URL hijacking

To prevent this HTTPS URL hijacking on a Windows computer, open the Control Panel and select Internet Properties. Then select the Connections Tab, and in it the LAN settings button. Un-check Automatically detect settings.

 

URL HijackingSteven Max Patterson 

Mac: How to reduce the risk of URL hijacking 

On a Mac select the Apple menu then System Preferences, then Network. Select the network service from the list, for example, Ethernet or Wi-Fi. The select Advanced, then finally deselect Proxies.

How the URL hijacking works

Itzik Kotler and Amit Klein of SafeBreach presented a proof of concept at the Black Hat conference yesterday that demonstrated how a web browser can be exploited to exfiltrate (extract) URLs from HTTP, HTTPS and FTP traffic. Users are reassured seeing https:// preceding the URL in their browser bars after the internet industry campaign two years ago to force websites to move from the clear text HTTP protocol to bidirectional SSL/TLS encrypted HTTPS. According to Kotler and Klein, this may not always be true, especially on public Wi-Fi and untrusted LANs

The LAN settings explained above turn on Web Proxy Auto-Discovery (WPAD) that automatically looks for a proxy auto-config (PAC) file that chooses the proxy server that is the intermediary through which the browser traffic flows. Many enterprises use this method to point web browsers and other user agents to the proxy server designated for a group of users. Alternatively, malware could insert a PAC file (proxy.pac) onto a computer with WPAD disabled to accomplish the same hijack. The researchers said it would be difficult for antivirus software to detect this type of attack.

When the infected computer connects to a malicious proxy server, the URLs can be exfiltrated. The collection of URLs extends beyond a violation personal privacy. The researchers said password reset URLs could also be intercepted, which could be initiated by a malicious actor who has some information about a user found on the internet, such as an email address or account information acquired through social engineering.

Although the HTTPS traffic between the user’s browser and the website can’t be read, the exploit could open up a two-way channel between the malicious proxy server, placing the computer at risk of further harm if the malicious actors were able to drop additional malware on the infected computer. This malware could be used in a denial of service attack or to steal data.

Avoiding untrusted networks is the best protection. Connecting to a MiFi or smartphone hotspot or using a VPN to connect through an untrusted network will protect from this threat.

Article Provided By: NetworkWorld

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

The Best Home Security Cameras of 2016

Security Cameras

See Camera Chart

One of the biggest benefits of a smart home is being able to know what’s going on when you’re not actually there. Whether you’re checking in on your kids, pets, or an exotic jewel collection, a home security camera is a great tool for keeping an eye on things from afar.

Although capabilities vary from device to device, surveillance cameras allow you to monitor what’s going on in your home through live or recorded video. But not all cameras are created equally. Some have alarms or can send you notifications when they detect activity, some offer two-way audio, some are meant to monitor your baby, and some even double as full-on home automation hubs.

We’ve tested lots of home surveillance cameras over the last few years, so we know what’s important to look for. For instance, you want a camera that’s simple to set up and use. Additionally, one of the very first qualities we notice is an attractive—though discreet—design. It’s important that the camera looks like something you actually want in your home, but depending on your needs, you may not want it to stand out too much.

Device support is critical as well. Our favorite cameras allow you to check in from anywhere, whether it’s an app on your phone or a Web browser. Additional features vary from camera to camera, and each of our top picks offer just enough variety to set them apart from the rest of the competition.

Here are some other important factors to consider when buying a home security cam:

The View

Even though 1080p is generally the standard resolution for cameras we’ve tested, and you won’t find any that stream or record in 4K any time soon, there are benefits to cameras with higher resolution sensors. Few home security cameras have optical zoom lenses, but almost all have digital zoom, which crop and enlarge whatever the camera is recording. The more megapixels a camera sensor has, the more you can digitally zoom in and still be able to see things clearly.

Besides resolution, consider the field of view as well. All security cameras have wide-angle lenses, but not all angles are created equal. Depending on the lens’ field of view, it can see between 100 and 180 degrees. That’s a big range in terms of the camera’s vision cone. If you want to watch a large area, you should consider a camera with a very wide field of view.

Connectivity

Most security cameras use Wi-Fi, but not all rely on it exclusively. Some add Bluetooth for local control and easier setup through your smartphone, while others incorporate separate home automation networking standards to interact with other devices, like ZigBee or Z-Wave. For most cameras, all you need to do is follow instructions on an app to connect them to your home network.

Once your camera is connected, you’ll almost certainly be able to access it through your smartphone or tablet. The vast majority of home security cameras today have mobile apps, and many focus entirely around those apps for doing everything. Some have Web portals as well, which add flexibility for accessing your videos and alerts from anywhere.

Cloud Storage

The videos your camera records probably won’t be stored on the camera itself. Most home security cameras use cloud services to store and offer remote access to footage. Some models have microSD card slots so you can physically pull the video from them when you want to review footage, but this is a rare feature.

Keep in mind that not all cloud services are alike, even for the same camera. Depending on the manufacturer, your home security camera will store different amounts of footage for different lengths of time. This service is often a paid subscription on top of the price of the camera itself, though some cameras offer free cloud storage to varying degrees. Cloud storage service is usually offered in tiers, letting you choose between keeping footage for a week, a month, or more.

Price

As you can see from our picks, most of the top-rated home security cameras on the market are roughly in the $200 range, but some of them also require an additional fee to store recorded video in the cloud. We break down any extra fees in our reviews, so it’s worth taking a look at each to find out which one fits your budget. Then again, you can’t really put a price on peace of mind.

Article Provided By: PC

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

Why Your Business Needs a Security System

Today’s Security System are not just Bells and Whistles.

It’s a new age for Security Systems and Technology, with today’s systems employing many different kinds of technology. Technology like, Surveillance Cameras, Access Control, devices for the Networking of building systems, Fire Alarms, and Monitoring.

Access Control

Security

Any mechanism or system that manages access through the authorization or revocation of rights to physical or logical assets within an organization is considered access control. Great definition right! But why do I need access control? Well, there can be many different reasons why a company or property owner could need access control. Here are just a few.

  • Who is in the Building.  Know who is in your facility, manage their level of access and meet regulatory compliance objectives.
  • A safe environment for tenants, employees, visitors, and contractors. Protect people, facilities, networks, and assets.
  • Control access to highly secure areas.  Solutions can be designed to protect your facilities that require a higher level security. Areas with sensitive data, networks, and critical or high-value information.
  • Commercial fleet fueling stations. RFID enabled fueling automation system to monitor and control commercial fleet fuel access, cost, and billing.

Cameras

The cameras are most often used for security, but they can also be used for building management. If there’s a broken window, trash left in the hallways (like a couch or old bed), tenants walking pets around the buildings social areas and leaving a mess (you can guess what kind), all of these and more can be monitored with Security Cameras to better help the property manager/owner manage the property or properties if you have more than one location.

Tenants who engage in any kind of misbehavior are caught on camera, identified and can be warned or fined for their actions. Once tenants and their visitors realize they can’t get away with the inappropriate behavior, it will stop. This translates to significant savings in operational costs for the property owners and justifies the cost of the cameras.

Fire Alarms and Monitoring

If there is a fire, a break-in, or if someone pushes a panic button, an alarm monitoring team is aware of it the moment it happens. Emergency agencies can be called into action immediately – police, fire, ambulance, or any necessary support services are filled in on the details about your home or business, and the designated contact is called. All of this happens within minutes of the alarm.

So, Why?

There are many reasons to have a Security System, and security companies try to plan for your needs. But it’s the things in life that happen that you least except that generate the need for a Security System.

So, Why do you need a Security System? Put simply, a Security System is your plan to handle the worst of what life throws at you.

By: Lance Roberts

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com