How to Quantify the Risk of an Insider Threat

Insider Risk

risk

Never before have there been so many platforms that let a growing number of people touch, manipulate, download, and share sensitive data.

But there’s a dark side to all that access: It exposes a company to malicious intent and theft of information worth thousands, sometimes millions, of dollars. More alarming is the fact that less than half (42 percent) of all organizations have the appropriate controls in place to prevent these attacks, according to the Insider Threat Spotlight Report.

How do you get a handle on this threat? Mitigation begins with assigning risk levels to employee roles. Who has access to sensitive information, intellectual property, trade secrets, customer lists, and any other proprietary data? That’s the foundation of your risk model. Many companies use a simple numerical scale of 1-10, with 10 as the highest risk. Others may prefer simpler categories like Low, Medium, and High or yellow, orange, and red alerts.

It turns out that nearly 80 percent of employee fraud takes place in accounting, operations, sales, senior management, customer service, and purchasing. But it’s critical to establish a risk profile for everyone in the company, no matter which department. Take into account employees’ current roles, levels of privilege, and required access to proprietary information. Senior IT people and C-Suite executives obviously have more privilege and access than mid-level managers and clerical workers. And, of course, the higher the risk in a potential disaster, the greater the need to monitor an employee’s activities.

Prepare to update the risk profile of an individual. Organizations are dynamic, and employees regularly make lateral moves or get promoted. Someone who doesn’t touch sensitive information in one role may very well have access and new privileges in a different assignment.

Employees’ personal lives change constantly, too. A traumatic event, like a death in the family or divorce, psychological problems, or a shift in financial circumstances for the worse—any of these can cause behavioral changes in people. And they all may require re-evaluation of an individual’s level of risk.

Once you’re committed to the process, we recommend taking the following steps:

  1. Create an insider-risk team. While IT and its security team may oversee the monitoring of user activity, the process really requires support from the most senior ranks, as well as other departments. Your legal department help can help decide how to monitor while complying with the law and act as a critical liaison between executives and the security group. Human resources can help support the need and processes for monitoring, as well document employee cases—and put a “human” face on the operation.
  2. Designate risk levels. This, of course, is what I’ve been discussing in this post all along: using job titles to assign a scale of risk, depending on levels of privilege and access.
  3. Pinpoint inappropriate conduct. Just because you’ve assigned someone a high-risk level doesn’t necessarily mean that he’s committing an offense. Conversely, an employee’s inappropriate behavior can sometimes be misread as performance of normal job-related tasks. That’s why it’s critical to develop ways to identify truly improper conduct through changes in an individual’s communication and behavior. You can do that through software that is known as user-behavior analytics and, less technically, by means of procedures your employees can follow to report troublesome behavior.
  4. Set up a system of insider monitoring. When you’re establishing a system to keep an eye on employee activity and behavior, it helps to decide what level of monitoring goes along with the different risks they may pose to your organization. For example, someone in a low-risk category probably can’t interact with sensitive information and therefore needs little more than the less-technical sort of monitoring suggested above. Medium-risk employees do have access to proprietary data and, so, may require monitoring additionally with user-behavior analytics. So, too, with those high-risk individuals who should probably be subject to the most active monitoring and review.

Quantifying risk is just the start of mitigating insider threats. But if you develop the initial baseline—starting with job title and access to privileged information—you can get a better handle on which employees you will have to monitor during such critical periods as hiring, job title and personal changes, and the high-risk exit period.

Article Provided By: Info-Security Magazine

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Home Automation: A Beginner’s Guide

What if all the devices in your life could connect to the Internet? Not just computers and smartphones, but everything: clocks, garage doors, speakers, lights, doors, windows, window blinds, door bells, hot water heaters, appliances, you name it. And what if those devices could all communicate, send you information, and take your commands? It’s not science fiction; it’s the Internet of Things (IoT), and it’s a key component of home automation.

Home automation is what it sounds like: automating the ability to control items around the house—from window shades to pet feeders—with a simple push of a button (or a voice command). Some activities, like setting up a lamp to turn on and off at your whim, are simple and relatively inexpensive. Others, like advanced surveillance cameras, may require a more serious investment of time and money.

Still, imagine monitoring your home using an interface on your computer, tablet, or smartphone, or even panels mounted around the house. It’s like going from using the Clapper to beaming up to the U.S.S. Enterprise.

Home automation is going mainstream. Your house is going to get smart, no matter what. Get in on the ground floor and become the family home automation expert. Here’s how to get started.

Home-Automation Technologies

Before you buy a bunch of home-automation products, it helps to understand the technologies involved in setting up and using them. These products use many different communication protocols. Some are wired, some wireless, and some are a combination. Try to stick with one protocol when buying products, or get a hub/gateway that supports multiple protocols.

X10
x10This granddaddy of home automation protocols dates back to the 1970s and has gone from power line-based to wireless. X10 is not known for robust speed or great communication between units on the home automation network. It is, however, typically inexpensive.


ZigBee
ZigBee is a wireless 802 standard from the IEEE, which is to say, a bunch of gearheads came up with it before an outside group (the ZigBee Alliance) made up of vendors created products that use it. One of the key elements in IEEE 802.15.4 (its real name) is that it makes a mesh network so that most of the devices communicate equally. It’s also very low power. (You may also hear about Thread, a new wireless protocol that uses the same radio chips and frequency at ZigBee, and connects up to 250 devices in a home to the cloud.)


Z-Wave
Another wireless home automation protocol, Z-Wave is owned by one company, Sigma Designs, which makes all the chips for other vendors to make Z-Wave-capable products, known as the Z-Wave Alliance.


Insteon
This may be the best of all protocols because it combines a wired power line-based protocol with wireless. Both work as a mesh; all nodes on an Insteon home automation network are peers that can communicate when in proximity. If one fails, the other mesh can take over. You can buy Insteon devices at Smarthome.com, which is run by SmartLabs, the developers of Insteon. It’s compatible with X10.


Wi-Fi
This is the networking protocol we’re all used to for sharing an Internet connection among laptops, game consoles, and so much more. It’s super-fast and ubiquitous. So, of course, it’s inevitable that some vendors would make home automation products to take advantage of it. The other protocols use less power and bandwidth but Wi-Fi’s reach can’t be understated, even if it is overkill to use it to turn a lamp on and off.


Bluetooth
A staple of every PC, smartphone, and tablet, Bluetooth is better known for connecting items at a short range like keyboards, mice, headphones, and earbuds. But a lot of new products use the Bluetooth 4.0, aka Bluetooth Low Energy, aka Bluetooth Smart. It doesn’t require purposeful re-connection all the time, making it a good solution for select IoT items.


Top-Rated Home Automation Products

Just as there are many home automation protocols, there are many product categories, so you can control everything from lights and temperature to locks and security in your home. Here’s a quick rundown of our favorites.

 

Hubs

Samsung SmartThings Hub

Samsung SmartThings Hub / Home Automation


Our current Editors’ Choice for home automation hubs, the Samsung SmartThings Hub$99.00 at Amazon box works with devices that use Z-Wave, Zigbee, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. It got major improvements after Samsung bought SmartThings, including support for video surveillance cameras. Get it as a standalone box or as a $249 starter kit with monitors for temperature and vibration. There are 200 products that work with SmartThings.

 


 

Surveillance Cameras

Icontrol Networks Piper nv

Icontrol Networks Piper nv Security Camera

Piper nv$272.98 at Amazon is surveillance camera you can watch remotely from an iOS or Android device, perfect for keeping an eye on the house, the pets, even as a baby monitor. But it’s a lot more than that. It’s also a Z-Wave controller, monitoring all sorts of sensors to give you household control no matter where you are. The camera is excellent, with pan, tilt, and zoom functions plus sharp night vision and two-way audio.

 


 

Controllers

Amazon Echo

Amazon Echo

Is this Bluetooth speaker really all that when it comes to home automation or controls? It can be, and will only get better. Echo$179.99 at Amazon, Amazon’s voice-controlled audio concierge, pair with Web automation service IFTTT to control home devices like a thermostat or lights, via recipes you can create yourself. It might take a little work, but soon your house could be entirely controlled by the sound of your voice.

 

Logitech Harmony Ultimate Home

Harmony Ultimate Home

Don’t like talking and prefer to push buttons? Our review calls the Logitech Harmony Ultimate Home$215.99 at Amazon the “ultimate universal remote” for a reason. It controls a lot more than just TV and stereo. The pricey unit connects with the included Harmony Home Hub that talks via Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, or infrared (you pay a little more to add ZigBee and Z-Wave connectivity).

 


 

Heating and Cooling

Nest Learning Thermostat

Nest Thermostat

The Nest Learning Thermostat $195.99 at Amazon is like a piece of digital art that controls your temperature. It was, after all, designed by the guys who created the iPod. It has built-in Wi-Fi so you can remotely control the temperature from phone, tablet, or PC. It’s not cheap, but Nest will look right at home in any smart house. Plus, Nest Labs (owned by Alphabet, parent company of Google), also makes networkable smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors$99.99 at Best Buy that talk to you rather than blare alarms.

 

Ecobee3 Smart WiFi Thermostat

Nice as the Nest is, it’s not our top pick. The Editors’ Choice goes to theEcobee3$249.00 at Amazon. It’s a stylish device you can control remotely. Best of all, it’s not dependent on just monitoring home temperature from one spot—it checks multiple sensors in multiple rooms.

 


 

Lighting

Philips Hue Connected Bulb

Philips Hue Lux

Want complete wireless supremacy over the lights in your home? Philips Hue $154.99 at Amazon delivers with bulbs that you control not only the intensity of the light, but also the color. It’s expensive to be sure, but the Hue ecosystem has been around long enough that it works with just about every other system out there, from Amazon Echo to IFTTT (If This Then That) to Siri (using the Philips Hue Bridge 2.0). If you want a cheaper price of entry, try the off-white-light only Philips Hue Lux Starter Kit $79.99 at Dell for half the price. The Hue apps can even control third-party smart bulbs. Philips sells a number of other Hue products, including table lamps, a suspension lamp, and the interest Philips Hue Go portable smart light.

 


Locks and Home Security Systems

Schlage Sense

Schlage Sense

There are a lot of smart locks/deadbolts on the market now, but our favorite is the newSense$209.99 at Amazon from longtime lock maker Schlage. It’s pricey, but easy to install, works with iPhones (via Siri voice control), and will let in only who you specify. You can also just use the touchpad on the front to unlock the door.

 

Vivint

Vivint Line Up 2016

Vivint used to be APX Alarm Security Solutions, but now has a cool name to go along with expanding beyond security into home automation. We gave four stars to its Vivint Sky$49.99 at Vivint, which includes subscription-based remote monitoring by pros that costs from $50 to $70 per month and a panel in your home for controlling it yourself. It doesn’t beat our favorite self-installed home security system (the iSmartAlarm Premium $299.00 at Amazon), but if you want pro-installation and an extra set of eyes, Vivint is an excellent choice. It can even be controlled with the Amazon Echo.

 

SimpliSafe Home Security System

SimpliSafe Home Security System Keypad

If you prefer to stick to a DIY approach to smartening up the home, check out the SimpliSafe system $259.95 at Amazon. While it lacks a camera, it makes up for that with reasonable prices with monthly monitoring of a wide range of sensors. It comes in five different packages, so you can get exactly what’s right for your home.

 


Outdoors

Rachio Iro Smart Sprinkler Controller

Rachio Monitor

It’s not much to look at, but the Rachio Iro Smart Sprinkler Controller $249.00 at Home Depot can make sure you water your lawn only when needed—even if you’re not home. It works with IFTTT to make sure the droplets only come out when the weather calls for it.

Article Provided By: PC

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Integrating Security Systems for Greater Business Value

Integrating Security Systems for Greater Business Value

Integrating Security Systems for Greater Business Value - Network

Security countermeasures, such as surveillance, address threats and if done effectively eliminate them; this is more likely the case when an integrated solution is deployed.  In looking at integrated security solutions, there exists an opportunity to move beyond a view of providing countermeasures to threats toward a new perspective of security as a means of delivering critical business value.
Security systems use multiple techniques in order to achieve this. The combination of access control, intrusion detection, perimeter and video into an integrated security solution provides the best opportunity to counter threats and add value.

Traditionally security systems have been seen as providing five “D”s. That is security systems deter, detect, deny, delay and defend against threats. And while these are important functions, the value of security needs to move beyond these traditional security concepts to one of delivering value to the enterprise. In some cases this is simply learning to describe security in new terms; in other cases it is learning to leverage systems to deliver new outcomes.

While standalone surveillance systems exist, more often than not they are part of integrated security solutions. In the case of integrated security solutions, the surveillance system is used in combination with access, perimeter and intrusion detection. The value of a security solution increases in relationship to the extent of its integration with other security and information technology components.

Access control, perimeter and intrusion detection allow surveillance solutions to be focused on specific security transactions. This improves operator performance while reducing screen fatigue. It also allows transaction information to be combined with visual data, and integrated perimeter solutions to be combined with pan-tilt-zoom features of surveillance cameras.

Integrated security solutions address governance, risk management and compliance (GRC) in addition to security. This cannot be addressed by surveillance alone, but it can provide additional return on investment to the CEO, CFO and CIO while addressing sector-specific compliance regimes. These systems can bake in security across transactions and provide value to stakeholders and shareholders.

These solutions allow coupling with information technology systems to increase the details available around security events. This can be combined with information from information technology systems such as security information and event management. Access control information, along with video, can place individuals at particular locations to help determine whether or not accounts have been compromised or if in fact an insider threat exists.

Integration also talks to important current trends in the enterprise: Physical security systems have extensive logging capabilities. These logs represent not only specific transactions but also metadata that can be used not only by physical and information security groups but also by marketing and other parts of the organization. As an example, surveillance video can not only be used to guard against physical breaches or theft but also to measure customer traffic and related buying behaviors. Surveillance cameras, in addition to the balance of an integrated security system’s components, represent the same kind of connected workplace that is driving the interest in the Internet of Things (IoT) and big data.

In looking for an integrated surveillance solution, remember that surveillance delivers its maximum value when it acts in combination with alarms, access, video, perimeter and command and control. Users should be careful not to break apart these capabilities particularly at the command and control level.

This is where the meaning of integrated security really comes into play. Video management systems provide important features in delivering surveillance solutions. Integration of these video features along with other security functions in the security operations center under the command and control function will deliver the most value and needs to be a strong factor in deploying an integrated solution.  Look for an integrated security system that maximizes surveillance value and in the process you will find you have also maximized the value of security.

Article provided by Security Magazine

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New Surveillance Technology Can Track Everyone In An Area For Several Hours At A Time

The Future of Home Security

The future of home security: Get ready for sensors and pro-active systems

The future of home security: Get ready for sensors and pro-active systems

Today, home security is fairly straightforward. If you live in a home that has an “alarm” you’ve got a bevy of motion sensors dotted around your house, a central keypad by your front door with a standard keypad to disarm it and a box on the front of your house that says “look at me, I’m protecting something valuable inside”.

With the steady march of connected devices invading the home, and a number of companies looking to improve how we secure it, the future of home security is going to change drastically in the next couple of years, whether that is remotely controlling our lighting, seeing inside our house, or merely having sensors on our doors and windows detecting movement.

“Nothing concerns us more than the fear of someone breaking into our own home, yet very few homeowners heed the warnings until it’s too late,” explains Kris Hogg, chairman of CEDIA, the Custom Electronic Design and Installation Association. “A lot of the time monitored alarm systems can be integrated with the very latest hi-tech lighting and automation facilities in order to provide even greater levels of security.”

Those systems include integrating the alarm system with an intelligent lighting system, such as the Lutron Homeworks system, so all the lights in your property will automatically switch on or flash incessantly when an intruder is detected, or setting your lights to randomly come on and off while you are on holiday to fool would-be burglars.

It is not just about integrating security systems with lighting however, although that is a start.

The Future of Home Security

Piper is a camera that monitors your home.

Home security is just one of the areas that connected devices in the home are likely to play a large part, but we are just at the start of the journey according to Jeremy Peterson, GM of Honeywell’s EMEA Home Comfort & Energy Systems division:

“It will become a much more consumer experience. Things like recognising you to disarm the security system will be possible too, and if you look at what’s available now like video monitoring, it will certainly have a place, and we will continue to see those things, but stepping away from the traditional way of looking at security.”

Video monitoring is certainly the rage at the moment with devices like BT’s HomeCam, and Belkin’s WeMo NetCam HD Wi-Fi Camera all offering homeowners the chance to see what’s happening in their house at any given time, as long as you have an internet connection.

If it’s not basic camera offerings, devices like Piper, the successful Indigogo campaign or Canary are products that once plugged in, you can monitor a number of different points of data like movement, temperature or sound, as well as connect to other devices to help you control your lighting through a singleservice.

Where Peterson sees things moving forwards however is sensors, be it cameras, motion detectors, or markers tracking your movement in your home via Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, or GPS. It will mean your home security system will be able to pro-actively work to help you out rather than you having to remember a series of codes.

“The system architectures are going to become a lot more pro-active in making more things possible. The key fob on the wall has a broad audience, but you will continue to see much more flexible and device level security solutions. Those certainly have a lot of room to grow.”

Honeywell, Tado, and Google’s Nest, are all actively using geofencing to help better control intelligent heating systems and Honeywell sees this as just one of the keys to success in improving security in the home too.

In an interview with Pocket-lint, Peterson outlines a future scenario in the home whereby your house will automatically know you are at the front door and unlock the door, or disable the alarm for you:

“What we are working towards is a pro-active approach, but allowing them to craft the system they desire,” said Paterson, before warning that although the company already offers similar solutions to some of its 1.5 million business customers around the world, there is a big difference between providing comfort over security.

The Future of Home Security - i-Bell

i-Bell is an intelligent Wi-Fi enabled doorbell that will call your phone when someone rings the bell

“When you start moving from comfort to security, there is less willingness by Honeywell and the consumers to compromise. With door locks, for example, it has to work every time instantly, there is no room for error.”

While many have wondered, including us here at Pocket-lint, why we still don’t have central locking for our house but we do our car, it is understandably, the notion that we could be locked out of our homes simply because the computer as encountered an error would be unforgivable.

“We will do it when are ready rather than trying to be first to market,” added Paterson.

In the meantime we should probably just get used to having intelligent doorbells instead.

i-Bell is one such product hoping to let you see who is at your front door by connecting to your smartphone. The successfully backed Kickstarter Wi-Fi doorbell will notify you when someone is at the door and then let you talk to them via your smartphone even if you aren’t at home. Anyone that does knock automatically gets their photo taken so you’ve got a record of who has visited your house and you can tell them you are in, out, or simply trapped under a large cupboard.

Inside the house and sensors and iBeacon-like technology will be able to help determine where we are and what we are doing.

The Future of Home Security - Lightpad

Lightpad is hoping to make the switches in your home do more than just turn on a light

Lightpad, is an intelligent light switch due to launch in 2015 and will featureBluetooth that can, if you want, track you around the house.

Created by a new company called Plum, the LightPad is packed full of tech and has a capacitive multi-touch interface controlled by a number of gestures, along with a coloured LED on it allowing it to notify you if you have a message, or if something is wrong.

Utz Baldwin, CEO at Plum explains that having Bluetooth in the Lightpad it would mean that when you walked up to your front door, for example, the Lightpad would know you are approaching and then automatically turn on the lights as you walked through the door.

Others are looking to increase the number of sensors in our homes too. Nest’s intelligent smoke detector, Nest Protect, might have received some flack for being recalled, but it too uses a plethora of sensors to better inform the wider system. If carbon monoxide is detected in the house, for example, it turns the boiler off, as long as you’ve also got the company’s thermostat.

Fibaro, takes things even further offering a central hub that numerous sensors can wirelessly connect to. It can track everything from water, smoke, temperature, light, and movement as long as you’ve installed the right sensor.

So should we be prepared to live in a home full of sensors monitoring our every move? We put that question to Paterson at Honeywell:

“Consumers have to make those choices. The knowledge that they are giving up something to benefit themselves will be something they have to weigh up. For systems to make pro-active decisions you will need sensors, there is no real other way around it.”

The Future of Home Security - Fibaro

Fibaro wants to offer dozens of sensors to know what your house is doing

It’s a belief that Russell Ure, founder of Piper also has:

“I think sensors in the home is only a matter of time,” said the Canadian founder. “To achieve the level of automation that we want, you will need to have technology there to make it all happen. It will be required. As all of this technology becomes more and more capable, we will need more sensors.”

Paterson and Honeywell, don’t see that as a major stumbling block believing that when consumers trust the brand, like he says they already do with the quick adoption of Honeywell’s intelligent heating systems, that they will be happy to accept that to get the new benefits these systems bring, there will have to be some give and take.

Article provided by Pocket-Lint

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Did you like this article? If so, then you may want to read this one.

PCI Compliance

Here is a blog every online business should take a moment to read.(PCI Compliance)

2015 will be a defining year for data security

President Obama’s State of the Union address this week launched a new emphasis on an ever-present threat in our daily lives – cyberattacks, kicking off what will be a defining year for cybersecurity protection, and for us at the PCI Security Standards Council, pivotal in improving the protection of consumers’ payment information globally.

Public-private collaboration and information sharing, education and awareness and leveraging the most secure technology as emphasized by the president are critical to protect customers against the type of massive breaches we saw in 2014.  As the standard setting organization for payment security, we are leading the charge to provide the standards and resources to help businesses secure this information.

Too many CEO’s are learning this lesson the hard way.  For American corporate executives moving forward, data security is job security.  Companies that fail to make data protection an everyday priority run the risk of losing money, losing business and destroying their reputations.

The good news is we know what works and what doesn’t.  In recent years, we at PCI have not seen any data breaches that weren’t predictable.  On the contrary, problems arise from a failure to maintain key security controls and a lack of vigilance.  Simply put, most data security breaches involving credit card data are not sophisticated attacks at all, nor are they new tactics.  Far too many of the recent major breaches we have seen in the United States were entirely preventable.

Something as simple as a password can cause problems. A recent study by Trustwave reported that the most popular numeric password used by the American business community is 123456.  The word ‘password’ remains one of the most commonly used passwords.  It wouldn’t take a very sophisticated hacker to crack that code

Fortunately, data security is now becoming a top level issue, from the White House to Congress to corporate suites across America. President Obama’s speech this week will further drive the national conversation

Many companies need to change the way they view security issues. Passing a PCI Standards assessment is a first step, but properly following security standards 24/7 is required to prevent data breaches. Not all companies do that, thinking instead that once they check the box of passing a data security assessment their work is over. This kind of thinking is a major problem.  Data security cannot just be a “box you check” once or twice a year.  It has to be an all-day, everyday priority.  Protecting data is no longer a simple task that companies can just leave to the IT Department.

EMV Chip Technology

In 2015 America will take a major step by implementing EMV chip technology for consumers.  This is a critical step forward and will provide better data protection by adding a new additional layer of security.  EMV chip technology, which is already in use throughout much of the advanced world, provides consumers with strong security features. It helps businesses lock down their point of sale and provides protection against fraudulent transactions in face-to-face shopping environments.  However, while EMV chip technology is an additional layer in data security protection, it doesn’t solve every problem.  We should not be fooled into believing it is the magical technology that eliminates data security threats.  It isn’t.

EMV chip technology will not prevent fraud when a card is used online or in mail and telephone order purchases.  EMV technology also would not prevent breaches that involve targeted malware.

No one single technology is the answer. As we look towards the White House Cyber Security Summit at Stanford University next month, it is important for American businesses to prioritize strong security principles by maintaining a multi-layer security approach that involves people, process and technology working together to protect consumers.

It’s time for a change in the mindset about data security. Vigilance must be an everyday priority.

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your logo, web site, web application, need custom programming, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at dwerne@mojoe.net

Article Provided by The Hill

Computer Hacking Liability – Are You At Risk?

I had the great honor yesterday to speak at the InnoVision Forum on Computer Hacking Liability – Are You At Risk?.

We put together a presentation on our patent pending Firewall called “The Wall”. I have included that presentation in this post. Here is a look at the presentation:

What is PCI Compliance? PCI Compliance is now required for all business no matter how large or small.

Myths About PCI

•I can wait until my bank asks me to be PCI compliant.
•I don’t use a POS system I don’t need to be compliant.
•The software I use is PCI Compliant
•PCI is a law created by the credit card companies.
•The fines or fees are not that expensive.
•There is no state or federal regulation.
Resources:

Computer Hacking Liability – Are You At Risk?

Presented by McNair Law Firm, P.A.

Please join us for the
InnoVision Forum:

Computer Hacking Liability – Are You At Risk?
What To Do To Avoid Data Breaches and Hacking and
What To Do If You are Hacked

From the US Government to the State of South Carolina, companies and organizations of all sizes are under attack from hackers. The threat of these attacks has escalated so that cyber security professionals admit it is almost impossible to achieve 100% prevention.  According to Verizon’s 2011 report, small and medium sized businesses, as well as governments and municipalities, are the main targets.  Please join us to discuss the legal liability associated with hacking for you and your company, leading edge prevention measures to avoid hacking, and what your obligations are in the event that a breach is suspected or discovered.  We will also discuss the role of the financial institution in these circumstances.

PANEL INCLUDES:

Douglas W. Kim
Attorney
McNair Law Firm, P.A.

 

  • Doug will discuss the current laws concerning security requirements including the Red Flag Rules, PCI Compliance, South Carolina specific laws and recent cases involving hacking.  His discussion will include the recent case where a bank was required to repay monies lost to a customer due to hackers ($345,000.00).

Frank Mobley
Founder and CEO
Immedion, LLC

 

  • Frank will discuss current IT security risks and the prevalence and method of hacking.  He will also include information on how you can better protect your organization against illicit and illegal attempts to garner private information.

Deveren Werne
Founder of Mojoe.net and
Principal of Liquid Video Technologies, Inc.

 

  • Deveren will explain PCI compliance for businesses such as why a business should be PCI compliant and, if not, what are the repercussions of not being compliant, and what a business should do to become compliant from hardware to software perspective.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Presentations ~ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm Networking
Location – McNair Law Firm, P.A., Poinsett Plaza, Suite 700, 104 S. Main Street, Greenville, SC

Seating is limited, so please respond early

RSVP to Kathy Ham by email: kham@mcnair.net or by phone: (864) 552-9345

Founding Sponsor:
Deloitte Founding Sponsor of InnoVision Awards

www.innovisionawards.org
Celebrating excellence. Honoring distinction. Applauding innovation.