Celebrating Veterans Day November 11th 2016

In the United States and in other countries around the world, Veterans Day is celebrated on November 11. This day is the anniversary of the signing of the armistice, which ended the World War I hostilities between the Allied nations and Germany in 1918.

Veterans

Veterans Day honors those who served the United States in times of war.

Veterans Day – The Holiday

Veterans Day is intended to honor and thank all military personnel who served the United States in all wars, particularly living veterans. It is marked by parades and church services and in many places, the American flag is hung at half mast. A period of silence lasting two minutes may be held at 11am. Some schools are closed on Veterans Day, while others do not close, but choose to mark the occasion with special assemblies or other activities.

A Brief History

On November (the 11th month) 11th 1918, on the 11th hour, the armistice between Germany and the Allied nations came into effect. On November 11, 1919, Armistice Day was commemorated for the first time. In 1919, President Wilson proclaimed the day should be “filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory”. There were plans for parades, public meetings and a brief suspension of business activities at 11am.

Liquid Video Technologies would like to say “Thanks” to all the brave men and woman of the armed forces, Past and Present, who have served our country in times of war. Your service to the United States is an inspiration to future generations and your bravery is what helps make America the Great and Free country it is today.

THANK YOU!

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Labor Day

History of Labor Day

Labor Day: What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

Founder of Labor Day

The father of labor day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

Article Provided By: U.S. Department Of Labor

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Independence Day

Independence Day | July 4th | Fourth of July


4th of July Blog article header

Independence Day is a federal holiday in the US. In the United States, Independence Day, or more commonly known as the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday to commemorate the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on 4 July 1776, declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Independence Day is commonly associated with barbecues, picnics, concerts, carnivals, parades, fireworks,family reunions, political speeches and ceremonies.

There are also many other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States.

Independence Day celebrations often take place outdoors as it is summer in the US. Families will often celebrate Independence Day by hosting or attending a picnic or barbecue with family members, and they take advantage of the day off and when Independence Day falls on a Monday or Friday they take advantage of a long weekend to gather with relatives or friends.

Independence DayDecorations including balloons, streamers and clothing are generally colored red, white, and blue, the colors of the American Flag.

Parades are normally held in the morning, while fireworks displays occur in the evening at such places as parks, fairgrounds, near beaches and in town squares.

Independence Day in the United States – the Biggest Birthday Celebration in the World

Independence Day in the United States is by far the most important national holiday of the year.

While the fanfare is dwarfed by mega holidays like Christmas and New Year’s Eve, Independence Day is one of those days that the country and its people need, especially in complicated times such as the 21st century.

Commonly known as the Fourth of July or July 4th, Independence Day brings American people together in a way that not many other holidays can.

The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty symbolizes America’s independence and the freedom the country offers to all that enter. It was given to the United States in 1886 by France (shipped in 214 crates and assembled on what is now know as Liberty Island in the New York Harbor.)

National Importance

The United States is a fairly young country, and the original birthday of the US was actually not that long ago. In 1776, the original thirteen states came together and separated from England with the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4th. During this time, the brave Founding Fathers knew that the future ahead would be full of danger and risk to themselves and their families, but the importance of the country was greater than any one person.

Thus, in 1776, the United States of America was born. After years of extremely difficult fighting and war, the country came out on top and began its existence as a peaceful country. This was the defining moment for the country, and that is why Independence Day is of such great importance for American people even today. Without July 4th, there would be no America.

Independence Day – Placement on the Calendar

Due to the fact that the holiday is in the middle of summer time, there are countless festivals and parties all dedicated to celebrating this important day in the history and modern day USA. Also, because of its placement in the middle of summer, most traditional American summertime activities are in full swing by this time. These include water activities, beach trips, and cookouts and barbecues.

Activities for Independence Day

Independence Day
There are numerous activities that have been associated with July 4th, with most of them being in a celebratory fashion. Some of the most traditional aspects of July 4th are as follows:

Fireworks. If you look at any piece of promotional literature for a July 4th party, you will definitely see photos of fireworks exploding in a brilliant fashion. Fireworks, while not originally American, have become the primary symbol of the holiday. Besides the Red, White, and Blue, fireworks are an exact symbol of the USA and Independence Day.

Barbecues and Cook-outs. One of the most traditional ways for Americans to celebrate all summer holidays including Independence Day is to host or attend a cookout or barbecue. Most churches will have one of these events for its congregation on the 4th of July, and many will use it as an outreach to the community surrounding the church. Typically foods at these events include hot dogs, hamburgers, cheeseburgers, French fries, kebabs, steaks, and vegetables. This is a good way for friends and family to get together during the holidays off from work.

Concerts. There are always a number of concerts which take place around the country on Independence Day. Some of the songs which will be played include “The Star-Spangled Banner,” “Stars and Stripes Forever,” and “America, the Beautiful.”

Travel. For those Americans who love to travel, the Independence Day weekend is a perfect time to do it. With having a long weekend, more time can be enjoyed at the destination than on the road. Typically, some of the most popular destinations include water parks, state and national parks, beaches, and the mountains. City locations are usually not as popular during the Fourth of July weekend. The United States is a naturally diverse country, with impressive landscapes in almost every state. The national park system is one of the great contributions that the US gave to the rest of the world, and these original national parks can be visited during the Fourth of July weekend.

Take the Day Off

Since 1938, July 4th has been an official paid holiday for government officials. This gives Independence Day a special place on the calendar of the United States, as there are only a limited number of paid holidays on the calendar. It is likely that this day will never disappear from the American calendar.

While those who enjoy this day may not fully realize this, there is a long history of celebrations for Independence Day. Starting even during the Revolutionary War with England, Americans were setting up unique celebrations for this day. After the war, this day became a very special day used to unite the country in the midst of its quest to grow and prosper.

Unique Celebrations in the United States

There are a number of special events which are unique to specific places in the USA. The longest running July 4th event started in 1785 and continues to this day in Bristol, Rhode Island. This New England state holds a very notable parade. On Coney Island, New York, there is an annual hot dog eating contest sponsored by Nathan’s hot dogs. Started over sixty years ago, there is a joint celebration between Canada and the United States which climaxes with a large fireworks display over the Detroit River.

One of the longest running televised concerts is the performance by the Boston Pops Orchestra during a fireworks show in Boston, Massachusetts. In addition to this, the annual event on the front lawn of the Capitol building is also a long-running favorite among urban Americans.

Independence Day, the Biggest Birthday Party in the World

As a celebration of the United States of America’s Declaration of Independence in 1776, Independence Day is recognized as a large birthday celebration for one of the world’s most influential countries.

Overall, this is a day of patriotism and pride for the United States. It is a large birthday celebration which all Americans can enjoy. Positioned conveniently in the middle of summer vacation, the Fourth of July is very fun because of the fact that almost everyone has time to take off from work and reflect on the United States and its history. While much of the original events of the first July 4th have been lost over the years, the overreaching concept is still intact.

For Americans, this vitally important day is truly a day of celebration.

Let the fireworks begin!

Article Provided By: USA Federal Holidays Calendar

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Memorial Day 2016

memorial day

Memorial Day History

Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day and was initiated to honor the soldiers for the Union and Confederate armies who died during the American Civil War.

Celebrations honoring Civil War heroes started the year after the war ended. The establishment of a public holiday was meant to unify the celebration as a national day of remembrance instead of a holiday celebrated separately by the Union and Confederate states. By the late 19th century, the holiday became known as Memorial Day and was expanded to include the deceased veterans of all the wars fought by American forces. In 1971, Memorial Day became a federal holiday.

The original national celebration of Decoration Day took place on 30 May 1868. When Memorial Day became a federal holiday, it was given the floating date of the last Monday in May. Since many companies close for the holiday, Memorial Day weekend is three days long for most people. It is the unofficial beginning of the summer vacation season that lasts until the first Monday in September, which is Labor Day.

Traditions

Some of the most common Memorial Day traditions that are still practiced in the United States today include:

  • Every Memorial Day, the U.S. flag is quickly raised to the tops of flagpoles, slowly lowered to half-mast, and then raised again to full height at noon. The time at half-mast is meant to honor the million-plus fallen U.S. soldiers who have died for their country over the years. Re-raising the flag is meant to symbolize the resolve of the living to carry on the fight for freedom so that the nation’s heroes will not have died in vain.
  • It is very common to visit cemeteries, particularly military cemeteries, at this time of year to decorate the graves. Small American flags, flowers, and wreaths are commonly placed by the tombstones.
  • On the U.S. Capitol Building’s West Lawn, a Memorial Day concert is held annually. The musical performances are broadcast live around the country on PBS t.v. and NPR radio. Attendance is free, but most watch or listen from at home.
  • There are literally thousands of Memorial Day parades all across the country in cities small and large. Typically, you will see marching bands, National Guardsmen, other Armed Forces members, and military vehicles from past U.S. wars.
  • Many will wear or put on display red poppies on this day as a symbol of fallen soldiers. This tradition grew out of the famous poem by Canadian John McCrae who was known as In Flander’s Fields, which he was inspired to write upon seeing red poppies growing over the graves of World War I soldiers. You may well hear this poem’s opening lines quoted on Memorial Day:

    “In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row”

     

Events

Many families go on vacation on Memorial Day weekend, and many others who are off work or out of school stay home and enjoy family picnics and get-togethers. Most people open their swimming pools for the first time of the year as Memorial Day also ushers in those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer. If you do get out for the holiday, five events you may wish to attend are listed below. However, you can also view many of these events on the television if you remain at home.

  • Numerous Memorial Day events are held at Arlington National Cemetery every year. If you visit, you can see a quarter-million miniature flags decorating the graves in the cemetery, witness the changing of the guard ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns, attend the official Memorial Day service in the amphitheater, and much more.
  • You may wish to visit Washington D.C.’s National Mall, which is a two-mile stretch of land along the Potomac River that lies between the Washington Monument and the U.S. Capital Building. In it, you will find the Lincoln Memorial, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, the National World War II Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, the National Museum of American History, and numerous other important places of historic interest.
  • The oldest Memorial Day parade in the nation still takes place annually in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and tens of thousands attend. Nearby, you can also visit the Gettysburg Soldiers National Monument and Cemetery, and tour the battlefield.
  • The National Memorial Day Parade on Constitution Avenue has been the nation’s largest since 2005, with over a quarter-million typically attending. There are whole military units that march by as well as floats and bands, and it is an unforgettable experience.
  • If you want some sports entertainment around Memorial Day, the Indianapolis 500 auto race has been held on the Sunday just before Memorial Day since 1911. The NASCAR Coca-Cola 600 and the Memorial Tournament golfing event are also held at this time of year.

There is much patriotic significance attached to Memorial Day, and there are many events, both public and private, going on. If you travel for the weekend, be sure to plan ahead, book early, and drive safely on roads and airports will be very busy at this time of year.

Article Provided By: PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

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The Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday

Martin Luther King

In January of 1983 the then President Ronald Reagan, signed into law the national Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday. The holiday is a celebration of Dr. King’s immeasurable contribution to the United States, and to mankind.

Martin Luther King Jr. The Man

Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs.

Martin Luther King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and in 1957 helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia and helped organize the 1963 nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream“ (click the link and view the speech) speech. This heartfelt and moving speech established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history.

Martin Luther King Jr. won the Nobel Peace Prize on October 14, 1964, for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Then in 1965, with the help of others he organize the Selma to Montgomery marches. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include poverty and speak against the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled “Beyond Vietnam”.

In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., later to be called the Poor People’s Campaign, when he was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4th. He was 39 years old at the time of his death.

In the years following his death, King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.

The Holiday

The Martin Luther King Holiday would not have been possible without the tireless leadership of his wife Mrs. Coretta Scott King, founder and long-time president of the King Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Martin Luther King Holiday is celebrated on the third Monday of January. It is a time when the nation pauses to remember Dr. King’s life, work and to also honor his legacy by making the holiday a day of community service. Many organizations, nationwide, host annual Martin Luther King Day Collective Challenges called “a Day On, Not a Day Off”, where volunteers go out into local communities and help community partners with projects.

Article By: Lance Roberts

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NEW YEARS

New Years

Civilizations around the world have been celebrating the start of each new year for at least four millennia. Today, most New Years festivities begin on December 31 (New Years Eve), the last day of the Gregorian calendar, and continue into the early hours of January 1 (New Years Day). Common traditions include attending parties, eating special New Years foods, making resolutions for the new year and watching fireworks displays.

EARLY NEW YEARS CELEBRATIONS

The earliest recorded festivities in honor of a new years arrival date back some 4,000 years to ancient Babylon. For the Babylonians, the first new moon following the vernal equinox—the day in late March with an equal amount of sunlight and darkness—heralded the start of a new year. They marked the occasion with a massive religious festival called Akitu (derived from the Sumerian word for barley, which was cut in the spring) that involved a different ritual on each of its 11 days. In addition to the new year, Atiku celebrated the mythical victory of the Babylonian sky god Marduk over the evil sea goddess Tiamat and served an important political purpose: It was during this time that a new king was crowned or that the current ruler’s divine mandate was symbolically renewed.

Throughout antiquity, civilizations around the world developed increasingly sophisticated calendars, typically pinning the first day of the year to an agricultural or astronomical event. In Egypt, for instance, the year began with the annual flooding of the Nile, which coincided with the rising of the star Sirius. The first day of the Chinese new year, meanwhile, occurred with the second new moon after the winter solstice.

NEW YEARS TRADITIONS

In many countries, New Years celebrations begin on the evening of December 31—New Year’s Eve—and continue into the early hours of January 1. Revelers often enjoy meals and snacks thought to bestow good luck for the coming year. In Spain and several other Spanish-speaking countries, people bolt down a dozen grapes-symbolizing their hopes for the months ahead-right before midnight. In many parts of the world, traditional New Years dishes feature legumes, which are thought to resemble coins and herald future financial success; examples include lentils in Italy and black-eyed peas in the southern United States. Because pigs represent progress and prosperity in some cultures, pork appears on the New Years Eve table in Cuba, Austria, Hungary, Portugal and other countries. Ring-shaped cakes and pastries, a sign that the year has come full circle, round out the feast in the Netherlands, Mexico, Greece and elsewhere. In Sweden and Norway, meanwhile, rice pudding with an almond hidden inside is served on New Years Eve; it is said that whoever finds the nut can expect 12 months of good fortune.

Other customs that are common worldwide include watching fireworks and singing songs to welcome the new year, including the ever-popular “Auld Lang Syne” in many English-speaking countries. The practice of making resolutions for the new year is thought to have first caught on among the ancient Babylonians, who made promises in order to earn the favor of the gods and start the year off on the right foot. (They would reportedly vow to pay off debts and return borrowed farm equipment.)

In the United States, the most iconic New Years tradition is the dropping of a giant ball in New York City’s Times Square at the stroke of midnight. Millions of people around the world watch the event, which has taken place almost every year since 1907. Over time, the ball itself has ballooned from a 700-pound iron-and-wood orb to a brightly patterned sphere 12 feet in diameter and weighing in at nearly 12,000 pounds. Various towns and cities across America have developed their own versions of the Times Square ritual, organizing public drops of items ranging from pickles (Dillsburg, Pennsylvania) to possums (Tallapoosa, Georgia) at midnight on New Years Eve.

Article Provided By: History

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HISTORY OF CHRISTMAS

Christmas

There is more to the holiday we know has Christmas.

Christmas is both a sacred religious holiday and a worldwide cultural and commercial phenomenon. For two millennia, people around the world have been observing it with traditions and practices that are both religious and secular in nature. Christians celebrate Christmas Day as the anniversary of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, a spiritual leader whose teachings form the basis of their religion. Popular customs include exchanging gifts, decorating Christmas trees, attending church, sharing meals with family and friends and, of course, waiting for Santa Claus to arrive. December 25–Christmas Day–has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1870.

AN ANCIENT HOLIDAY

The middle of winter has long been a time of celebration around the world. Centuries before the arrival of the man called Jesus, early Europeans celebrated light and birth in the darkest days of winter. Many peoples rejoiced during the winter solstice, when the worst of the winter was behind them and they could look forward to longer days and extended hours of sunlight.

In Scandinavia, the Norse celebrated Yule from December 21, the winter solstice, through January. In recognition of the return of the sun, fathers and sons would bring home large logs, which they would set on fire. The people would feast until the log burned out, which could take as many as 12 days. The Norse believed that each spark from the fire represented a new pig or calf that would be born during the coming year.

The end of December was a perfect time for celebration in most areas of Europe. At that time of year, most cattle were slaughtered so they would not have to be fed during the winter. For many, it was the only time of year when they had a supply of fresh meat. In addition, most wine and beer made during the year was finally fermented and ready for drinking.

In Germany, people honored the pagan god Oden during the mid-winter holiday. Germans were terrified of Oden, as they believed he made nocturnal flights through the sky to observe his people, and then decide who would prosper or perish. Because of his presence, many people chose to stay inside.

AN OUTLAW CHRISTMAS

In the early 17th century, a wave of religious reform changed the way Christmas was celebrated in Europe. When Oliver Cromwell and his Puritan forces took over England in 1645, they vowed to rid England of decadence and, as part of their effort, cancelled Christmas. By popular demand, Charles II was restored to the throne and, with him, came the return of the popular holiday.

The pilgrims, English separatists that came to America in 1620, were even more orthodox in their Puritan beliefs than Cromwell. As a result, Christmas was not a holiday in early America. From 1659 to 1681, the celebration of Christmas was actually outlawed in Boston. Anyone exhibiting the Christmas spirit was fined five shillings. By contrast, in the Jamestown settlement, Captain John Smith reported that Christmas was enjoyed by all and passed without incident.

After the American Revolution, English customs fell out of favor, including Christmas. In fact, Christmas wasn’t declared a federal holiday until June 26, 1870.

IRVING REINVENTS CHRISTMAS

It wasn’t until the 19th century that Americans began to embrace Christmas. Americans re-invented Christmas, and changed it from a raucous carnival holiday into a family-centered day of peace and nostalgia. But what about the 1800s peaked American interest in the holiday?

The early 19th century was a period of class conflict and turmoil. During this time, unemployment was high and gang rioting by the disenchanted classes often occurred during the Christmas season. In 1828, the New York city council instituted the city’s first police force in response to a Christmas riot. This catalyzed certain members of the upper classes to begin to change the way Christmas was celebrated in America.

In 1819, best-selling author Washington Irving wrote The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, gent., a series of stories about the celebration of Christmas in an English manor house. The sketches feature a squire who invited the peasants into his home for the holiday. In contrast to the problems faced in American society, the two groups mingled effortlessly. In Irving’s mind, Christmas should be a peaceful, warm-hearted holiday bringing groups together across lines of wealth or social status. Irving’s fictitious celebrants enjoyed “ancient customs,” including the crowning of a Lord of Misrule. Irving’s book, however, was not based on any holiday celebration he had attended – in fact, many historians say that Irving’s account actually “invented” tradition by implying that it described the true customs of the season.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

Also around this time, English author Charles Dickens created the classic holiday tale, A Christmas Carol. The story’s message-the importance of charity and good will towards all humankind-struck a powerful chord in the United States and England and showed members of Victorian society the benefits of celebrating the holiday.

The family was also becoming less disciplined and more sensitive to the emotional needs of children during the early 1800s. Christmas provided families with a day when they could lavish attention-and gifts-on their children without appearing to “spoil” them.

As Americans began to embrace Christmas as a perfect family holiday, old customs were unearthed. People looked toward recent immigrants and Catholic and Episcopalian churches to see how the day should be celebrated. In the next 100 years, Americans built a Christmas tradition all their own that included pieces of many other customs, including decorating trees, sending holiday cards, and gift-giving.

Although most families quickly bought into the idea that they were celebrating Christmas how it had been done for centuries, Americans had really re-invented a holiday to fill the cultural needs of a growing nation.

Article Provided By: History

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Thanksgiving – Then and Now

Thanksgiving -  The BirdThe First Thanksgiving

In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”—although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term at the time—the festival lasted for three days. While no record exists of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event, and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

Thanksgiving Becomes a National Holiday

In 1817, New York became the first of several states to officially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition. In 1827, the noted magazine editor and prolific writer Sarah Josepha Hale—author, among countless other things, of the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb”—launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians. Abraham Lincoln finally heeded her request in 1863, at the height of the Civil War, in a proclamation entreating all Americans to ask God to “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife” and to “heal the wounds of the nation.” He scheduled Thanksgiving for the final Thursday in November, and it was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. Roosevelt’s plan, known derisively as Franksgiving, was met with passionate opposition, and in 1941 the president reluctantly signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November.

THANKSGIVING TRADITIONS

In many American households, the Thanksgiving celebration has lost much of its original religious significance; instead, it now centers on cooking and sharing a bountiful meal with family and friends. Turkey, a Thanksgiving staple so ubiquitous it has become all but synonymous with the holiday, may or may not have been on offer when the Pilgrims hosted the inaugural feast in 1621. Today, however, nearly 90 percent of Americans eat the bird—whether roasted, baked or deep-fried—on Thanksgiving, according to the National Turkey Federation. Other traditional foods include stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. Volunteering is a common Thanksgiving Day activity, and communities often hold food drives and host free dinners for the less fortunate.

Parades have also become an integral part of the holiday in cities and towns across the United States. Presented by Macy’s department store since 1924, New York City’s Thanksgiving Day parade is the largest and most famous, attracting some 2 to 3 million spectators along its 2.5-mile route and drawing an enormous television audience. It typically features marching bands, performers, elaborate floats conveying various celebrities and giant balloons shaped like cartoon characters.

Beginning in the mid-20th century and perhaps even earlier, the president of the United States has “pardoned” one or two Thanksgiving turkeys each year, sparing the birds from slaughter and sending them to a farm for retirement. A number of U.S. governors also perform the annual turkey pardoning ritual.

Article Provided By: History

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Veterans Day

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is November 11th

Veterans Day is a public holiday that is dedicated to honoring anyone who has served in the United States military. The holiday began as a day to remember the end of World War I and was declared a holiday by President Woodrow Wilson in 1919. Originally known as Armistice Day, the holiday became Veterans Day in 1954.

Most federal workers are given the day off and there is no mail service in the United States on this day. Federal workers who are required to work during the holiday are often given additional compensation as a benefit.

When Woodrow Wilson declared 11 November a holiday, the primary intention was to have a day to reflect on the sacrifices of those who had served in the military during World War I. Observation of the holiday through parades and meetings was envisioned.

Today, many Americans observe the day by attending ceremonies and parades that are dedicated to honoring the troops for their service. These often allow veterans to speak about their time in the service and give Americans the opportunity to personally thank veterans for their sacrifice.

Some retail establishments and restaurant chains offer free or discounted meals for people who can prove their veteran status.

Veterans Day always falls on 11 November, but it may be observed on a different day due to the fact that it is a federal holiday. Federal employees and school children typically have the day off work and school, so the holiday is observed on the Monday following the actual date of the holiday if it happens to fall on a weekend.

November 11 was chosen as the official date for Veterans Day in reference to the ending of World War I. Germany signed an armistice with the Allies that signaled the end of the war on at 11 a.m. on 11 November 1918.

History By: Public Holidays

Greenlight A Vet

What is the Greenlight A Vet? Well, America’s veterans are some of our nation’s bravest, hardest-working men and women. However, it’s hard to show them the appreciation they deserve when, back home and out of uniform, they’re more camouflaged than ever. Greenlight A Vet is a campaign to establish visible national support for our veterans by changing one light to green.

Just change one light to green in a visible location-on your porch, in your home, or at your office-and keep it glowing every day as a symbol of appreciation and support for our veterans.

Liqiud Video Technologies would like to Thank all Veterans - Past, Present and Future for their service to our country.  Without your bravery the United States of America would be the land of Free.

Thank You!

July 4th

July 4th

July 4th

Variously known as the Fourth of July and Independence Day, July 4th has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution (1775-83). In June 1776, representatives of the 13 colonies then fighting in the revolutionary struggle weighed a resolution that would declare their independence from Great Britain. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later its delegates adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 until the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with typical festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues.

July 4th

THE BIRTH OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE

When the initial battles in the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists desired complete independence from Great Britain, and those who did were considered radical. By the middle of the following year, however, many more colonists had come to favor independence, thanks to growing hostility against Britain and the spread of revolutionary sentiments such as those expressed in Thomas Paine’s bestselling pamphlet “Common Sense,” published in early 1776. On June 7, when the Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House (later Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, the Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee introduced a motion calling for the colonies’ independence. Amid heated debate, Congress postponed the vote on Lee’s resolution, but appointed a five-man committee–including Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York–to draft a formal statement justifying the break with Great Britain.

On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of Lee’s resolution for independence in a near-unanimous vote (the New York delegation abstained, but later voted affirmatively). On that day, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail that July 2 “will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival” and that the celebration should include “Pomp and Parade…Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.” On July 4th, the Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson. Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence.

Article Provided By: History

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