The Best Home Security Cameras of 2017

security cameras

Security Cameras 2017

One of the biggest benefits of a smart home is being able to know what’s going on when you’re not actually there. Whether you’re checking in on your kids, pets, or an exotic jewel collection, a home security camera is a great tool for keeping an eye on things from afar.

Although capabilities vary from device to device, surveillance cameras allow you to monitor what’s going on in your home through live or recorded video. But not all cameras are created equally. Some have alarms or can send you notifications when they detect activity, some offer two-way audio, some are meant to monitor your baby, and some even double as full-on home automation hubs.

We’ve tested lots of home surveillance cameras over the last few years, so we know what’s important to look for. For instance, you want a camera that’s simple to set up and use. Additionally, one of the very first qualities we notice is an attractive—though discreet—design. It’s important that the camera looks like something you actually want in your home, but depending on your needs, you may not want it to stand out too much.

Device support is critical as well. Our favorite cameras allow you to check in from anywhere, whether it’s an app on your phone or a Web browser. Additional features vary from camera to camera, and each of our top picks offer just enough variety to set them apart from the rest of the competition.

Here are some other important factors to consider when buying a home security cam:

The View

Even though 1080p is generally the standard resolution for cameras we’ve tested, and you won’t find any that stream or record in 4K any time soon, there are benefits to cameras with higher resolution sensors. Few home security cameras have optical zoom lenses, but almost all have digital zoom, which crop and enlarge whatever the camera is recording. The more megapixels a camera sensor has, the more you can digitally zoom in and still be able to see things clearly.

Besides resolution, consider the field of view as well. All security cameras have wide-angle lenses, but not all angles are created equal. Depending on the lens’ field of view, it can see between 100 and 180 degrees. That’s a big range in terms of the camera’s vision cone. If you want to watch a large area, you should consider a camera with a very wide field of view.

Placement

If you want to keep an eye on the rooms of your home, there are plenty of options. If you want to keep an eye on your driveway, backyard, or front porch, you need to be more choosy. Not all home security cameras are rugged enough to be mounted outdoors. You need a camera that’s waterproof and can stand up to rain, snow, and sun, and survive the extreme temperatures of summer and winter. The Nest Cam Outdoor and Netgear Arlo are two models built specifically for use outdoors, while the Nest Cam Indoor and the Netgear Arlo-Q might not survive the next rainstorm if you mount them over your garage door.

Connectivity

Most security cameras use Wi-Fi, but not all rely on it exclusively. Some add Bluetooth for local control and easier setup through your smartphone, while others incorporate separate home automation networking standards to interact with other devices, like ZigBee or Z-Wave. For most cameras, all you need to do is follow instructions on an app to connect them to your home network.

Once your camera is connected, you’ll almost certainly be able to access it through your smartphone or tablet. The vast majority of home security cameras today have mobile apps, and many focus entirely around those apps for doing everything. Some have Web portals as well, which add flexibility for accessing your videos and alerts from anywhere.

Cloud Storage

The videos your camera records probably won’t be stored on the camera itself. Most home security cameras use cloud services to store and offer remote access to footage. Some models have microSD card slots so you can physically pull the video from them when you want to review footage, but this is a rare feature.

Keep in mind that not all cloud services are alike, even for the same camera. Depending on the manufacturer, your home security camera will store different amounts of footage for different lengths of time. This service is often a paid subscription on top of the price of the camera itself, though some cameras offer free cloud storage to varying degrees. Cloud storage service is usually offered in tiers, letting you choose between keeping footage for a week, a month, or more.

Price

As you can see from our picks, most of the top-rated home security cameras on the market are roughly in the $200 range, but some of them also require an additional fee to store recorded video in the cloud. We break down any extra fees in our reviews, so it’s worth taking a look at each to find out which one fits your budget. Then again, you can’t really put a price on peace of mind.

Featured in This Roundup

  • Icontrol Networks Piper nv

    $279.00
    $279.99 at Amazon The Icontrol Networks Piper nv is a unique security camera that doubles as a home automation hub. This time around it offers night vision, a more robust camera sensor, and a faster processor.

  • LG Smart Security Wireless Camera LHC5200WI (With ADT Canopy)

    $199.99
    $199.99 at Amazon LG’s Smart Security Wireless Camera LHC5200WI doubles as a home automation hub and offers contract-free professional ADT monitoring at a reasonable price.

  • Nest Cam Outdoor

    $199.00
    $189.99 at Amazon The Nest Cam Outdoor security camera offers sharp 1080p video, crisp night vision, and motion detection alerts in a stylish weatherproof enclosure.

  • Canary All-In-One Home Security Device

    $199.00
    $149.99 at Amazon The Canary All-In-One Home Security Device keeps tabs on your dwelling with 1080p video capture and sensors for air quality, humidity, and temperature.

  • Logi Circle

    $199.99
    $149.99 at Best Buy The Logi Circle is an attractive and easy-to-use home security camera that lacks a few of the more powerful scheduling and programming features of its competition.

  • Nest Cam Indoor

    $199.00
    $192.75 at Amazon The Nest Cam Indoor is a dual-band Wi-Fi surveillance camera that offers crisp 1080p video, motion and sound detection, and integration with other Nest devices. It’s a snap to install, but you have to pay to view recorded video.

  • Netgear Arlo Q

    $219.99
    $161.66 at Amazon The Netgear Arlo Q is a pricey home security camera that delivers sharp, colorful 1080p daytime imagery and clear night vision video.

  • Netgear Arlo Security System (VMS3230)

    $349.99
    $269.99 at Amazon With Netgear’s Arlo Security System, you can place wireless cameras just about anywhere to keep tabs on your home, but you’re trading some functionality for battery power.

  • Petcube Play

    $199.00
    $179.00 at Amazon The latest security camera from Petcube, the Play, solves all of the issues we had with the original by adding a 1080p camera, night vision, cloud storage, and alerts.

  • Zmodo Pivot

    $149.50
    $99.00 at Amazon Want to keep tabs on what’s happening at home when you’re not there? The Zmodo Pivot camera gives you a 360-degree view, delivers crisp 1080p video, and goes one step further by including multiple security and environmental sensors.

Article Provided By: PC Magazine

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eBay Launches eBay Authenticate to Prevent Counterfeiting

eBay Authenticate

eBay Authenticate

eBay is developing a new authentication program for some of its higher-end items to create a network of professional authenticators it can use to verify that products are legitimate.

Under the name eBay Authenticate, the program will begin with a pilot program in the US for top-end handbags. It plans to spread to more items throughout the year and hopes to grow the program internationally.

When listing an item in the target inventory set—such as high-end handbags—sellers will have an opportunity to opt-in to the authentication service for a fee. In return, there will be messaging on their listing that highlights that the item will be reviewed by a professional authenticator before it’s delivered to the buyer. If the item sells, a professional will authenticate the item. If the item passes inspection, the item will be forwarded to the buyer.

For listings in the target inventory set where the seller hasn’t adopted the authentication service, the buyer will still have the ability to utilize the service for a fee.

To further bolster consumer trust in the program, if a buyer receives an item following inspection and it’s found to be inauthentic, eBay will refund the buyer two times the cost of the original purchase price.

According to eBay, for sellers, the service will help them drive sales, promote products, and get top dollar for their items. For buyers, the service adds another layer of trust to allow them to shop confidently—no matter the price point.

Details on pricing for the service will be shared at a later date.

http://pages.ebay.com/authentication/

Article Provided By: Security Magazine

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4 information security threats that will dominate 2017

Cybercriminals are becoming more sophisticated and collaborative with every coming year. To combat the threat in 2017, information security professionals must understand these four global security threats.

Security Threats

As with previous years, 2016 saw no shortage of data breaches. Looking ahead to 2017, the Information Security Forum (ISF), a global, independent information security body that focuses on cyber security and information risk management, forecasts businesses will face four key global security threats in 2017.

“2016 certainly lived up to expectations,” says Steve Durbin, managing director of the ISF. “We saw all sorts of breaches that just seemed to get bigger and bigger. We lurched from one to another. We always anticipate some level of it, but we never anticipate the full extent. I don’t think anybody would have anticipated some of the stuff we’ve seen of late in terms of the Russians getting involved in the recent elections.”

The ISF says the top four global security threats businesses will face in 2017 are the following:

  1. Supercharged connectivity and the IoT will bring unmanaged risks.
  2. Crime syndicates will take quantum leap with crime-as-a-service.
  3. New regulations will bring compliance risks.
  4. Brand reputation and trust will be a target.

“The pace and scale of information security threats continues to accelerate, endangering the integrity and reputation of trusted organizations,” Durbin says. “In 2017, we will see increased sophistication in the threat landscape with threats being tailored to their target’s weak spots or threats mutating to take account of defenses that have been put in place. Cyberspace is the land of opportunity for hacktivists, terrorists and criminals motivated to wreak havoc, commit fraud, steal information or take down corporations and governments. The solution is to prepare for the unknown with an informed threat outlook. Better preparation will provide organizations of all sizes with the flexibility to withstand unexpected, high-impact security events.”

The top four threats identified by the ISF are not mutually exclusive. They can combine to create even greater threat profiles.

Supercharged connectivity and the IoT bring unmanaged risks

Gigabit connectivity is on the way, and it will enable the internet of things (IoT) and a new class of applications that will exploit the combination of big data, GPS location, weather, personal health monitoring devices, industrial production and much more. Durbin says that because connectivity is now so affordable and prevalent, we are embedding sensors everywhere, creating an ecosystem of embedded devices that are nearly impossible to secure.

Durbin says this will raise issues beyond privacy and data access: It will expand the threat landscape exponentially.

“The thing for me with 2017 is I describe it as an ‘eyes-open stance’ we need to take,” Durbin says. “We’re talking about devices that never ever had security designed into them, devices that are out there gathering information. It’s relatively simple to hack into some of these things. We’ve seen some moves, particularly in the U.S., to encourage IoT manufacturers to engineer some level of security into their devices. But cost is an issue, and they’re designed to link.”

Durbin believes many organizations are unaware of the scale and penetration of internet-enabled devices and are deploying IoT solutions without due regard to risk management and security. That’s not to say organizations should pull away from IoT solutions, but they do need to think about where connected devices are used, what data they have access to and then build security with that understanding in mind.

“Critical infrastructure is one of the key worry areas,” Durbin says. “We look at smart cities, industrial control systems — they’re all using embedded IoT devices. We have to make sure we are aware of the implications of that.”

“You’re never going to protect the whole environment, but we’re not going to get rid of embedded devices,” he adds. “They’re already out there. Let’s put in some security that allows us to respond and contain as much as possible. We need to be eyes open, realistic about the way we can manage the application of IoT devices.”

Crime syndicates take quantum leap with crime-as-a-service

For years now, Durbin says, criminal syndicates have been operating like startups. But like other successful startups, they’ve been maturing and have become increasingly sophisticated. In 2017, criminal syndicates will further develop complex hierarchies, partnerships and collaborations that mimic large private sector organizations. This, he says, will facilitate their diversification into new markets and the commoditization of their activities at the global levels.

“I originally described them as entrepreneurial businesses, startups,” Durbin says. “What we’re seeing is a whole maturing of that space. They’ve moved from the garage to office blocs with corporate infrastructure. They’ve become incredibly good at doing things that we’re bad at: collaborating, sharing, working with partners to plug gaps in their service.”

And for many, it is a service offering. While some organizations have their roots in existing criminal structures, other organizations focus purely on cybercrime, specializing in particular areas ranging from writing malware to hosting services, testing, money mule services and more.

“They’re interested in anything that can be monetized,” Durbin says. “It doesn’t matter whether it’s intellectual property or personal details. If there is a market, they will go out and collect that information.”

He adds that rogue states take advantage of some of these services and notes the ISF expects the resulting cyber incidents in the coming year will be more persistent and damaging than organizations have experienced previously.

New regulations bring compliance risks

The ISF believes the number of data breaches will grow in 2017, and so will the volume of compromised records. The data breaches will become far more expensive for organizations of all sizes, Durbin says. The costs will come from traditional areas such as network clean-up and customer notification, but also from newer areas like litigation involving a growing number of partners.

In addition, public opinion will pressure governments around the world to introduce tighter data protection legislation, which in turn will introduce new and unforeseen costs. Reform is already on the horizon in Europe in the form of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDP) and the already-in-effect Network Information Security Directive. Organizations conducting business in Europe will have to get an immediate handle on what data they are collecting on European individuals, where it’s coming from, what it’s being used for, where and how it’s being stored, who is responsible for it and who has access to it. Organizations that fail to do so and are unable to demonstrate security by design will be subject to potentially massive fines.

“The challenge in 2017 for organizations is going to be two-fold,” Durbin says. “First is to keep abreast of the changes in regulations across the many, many jurisdictions you operate in. The second piece is then how do you, if you do have clarity like the GDP, how do you ensure compliance with that?”

“The scope of it is just so vast,” he adds. “You need to completely rethink the way you collect and secure information. If you’re an organization that’s been doing business for quite some time and is holding personally identifiable information, you need to demonstrate you know where it is at every stage in the lifecycle and that you’re protecting it. You need to be taking reasonable steps even with your third party partners. No information commission I’ve spoken to expects that, come May 2018, every organization is going to be compliant. But you need to be able to demonstrate that you’re taking it seriously. That and the nature of the information that goes missing is going to determine the level of fine they levy against you. And these are big, big fines. The scale of fine available is in a completely different realm than anyone is used to.”

Brand reputation and trust are a target

In 2017, criminals won’t just be targeting personal information and identity theft. Sensitive corporate information and critical infrastructure has a bull’s eye painted on it. Your employees, and their ability to recognize security threats and react properly, will determine how this trend affects your organization.

“With attackers more organized, attacks more sophisticated and threats more dangerous, there are greater risks to an organization’s reputation than ever before,” Durbin says. “In addition, brand reputation and the trust dynamic that exists amongst customers, partners and suppliers have become targets for cybercriminals and hacktivists. The stakes are higher than ever, and we’re no longer talking about merely personal information and identity theft. High-level corporate secrets and critical infrastructure are regularly under attack, and businesses need to be aware of the more important trends that have emerged in the past year, as well as those we forecast in the year to come.”

While most information security professionals will point to people as the weakest link in an organization’s security, that doesn’t have to be the case. People can be an organization’s strongest security control, Durbin says, but that requires altering how you think about security awareness and training.

Rather than just making people aware of their information security responsibilities and how they should respond, Durbin says the answer is to embed positive information security behaviors that will cause employees to develop “stop and think” behavior and habits.

“2017 is really about organizations having to wake up to the fact that people do not have to be the weakest link in the security chain,” Durbin says. “They can be the strongest link if we do better about understanding how people use technology, the psychology of human behavior.”

Successfully doing so requires understanding the various risks faced by employees in different roles and tailoring their work processes to embed security processes appropriate to their roles.

Article Provided By: CIO

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Drones Doing Bad; Drones Doing Good (Part 2)

Drones

Drones (continued) – Innovative User-Defined Fields

According to Wydner, the system, which was installed by security systems integrator Steve Murphy of Chown Security, Portland, Oregon, had to not only work with existing HID Global identification cards used by students across campus; it also had to have an easy-to-access user repository. “A key feature that really helped us was the ability to add in user-defined fields because we needed to have our own unique key,” Wydner says.

The innovative charm of the access system’s technology, however, is its hand- shaking with other software platforms for a completely interoperable access and room reservation system. To accomplish this, Wydner and his team installed the data management engine (Pinwheel DME from SwiftData Technology). Pinwheel integrates data from the access system along with several other enterprise software solutions employed at the facility, including sophisticated room scheduling, Web calendar and online event registration software (from Dean Evans & Associates) and an enterprise resource planning platform from higher education software provider Ellucian.

However, there were several significant hurdles that had to be overcome by both the OSU IT group and others involved to help make these interoperability goals a reality. An integration of this magnitude had never been done before, so much of the project was uncharted water, comments Murphy. “We didn’t know quite where to begin,” Wydner adds. “We knew that we needed to get all of the user data – our faculty, staff members, and students. We needed some way of defining who is taking a college business class and which system we were going to pull that out of, whether that’s going to be our central student repository, Active Directory or if we were going to go off of Salesforce.”

Wydner said the university eventually decided the best way to bring this information together was to enter it into Salesforce, the San Francisco, California-based firm known for its Web customer relationship management system and its strength in application programming interfaces or APIs. He started a separate project focused on integrating the identification numbers from the campus HID cards into their Salesforce database. Aside from that, the team also had to figure out a way to format the data from Salesforce so that it would be recognized by the access and Dean Evans event management software solutions.

By using the Pinwheel data management engine or DME platform, students are now enrolled automatically based upon the information entered into the Ellucian enterprise resource planning system. The successful integration of these systems would not have been possible, however, without some of the unique features provided by the access control platform with its innovative way of combining the access levels of students and staff members with their respective rights and privileges through a process known as nesting.

Austin Hall also uses an automated lock system which saved significantly on time and manpower.

Door Access and Meeting Scheduling

“The main thing that our faculty and students enjoy about the integration is that they can just walk up to a project room or a meeting room [and] tap their OSU ID on the lock (AD-400 wireless networked locks from Schlage). It then opens up, lets them in, and it also gives them an automatic one-hour reservation on the room,” observes Wydner.

“Multi-tech locks are future-proof and access panels can handle up to 16 locks,” points out Murphy, who believes the project took system integration capabilities to new and innovative heights.

There are other tech trends embedded in such an approach, according to Mitchell Kane, president, Vanderbilt. As compared to security video, it may seem that advances in electronic access control emerge and evolve more slowly. From a hardware perspective, technology moves at a snail’s pace, says Kane. What is more innovatively important is the trend of interoperability with other systems and big data. Until recently, most data integration with access management was through HR or IT databases. Kane sees a trend toward integration with workflow applications, working with data on an automated level, based on logic and analytics.

The multifunctional ability can be viewed as innovative.

That’s the bottom line for Guy Grace, manager of security and emergency planning for the Littleton, Colorado, Public Schools, and who is installing a network-based communication and security system (the IX Series from Aiphone) featuring video entry security, internal communication, emergency stations, and paging. All units and apps in the systems can unlock doors remotely on a network, assist onsite visitors from an offsite location, broadcast emergency announcements and communicate using Power over Ethernet (PoE).

Among the “cool things we get from the technology is the intercom’s ability to record audio and video of visitors on our network digital video recorders or NDVRs. So now we have an extra camera, the ability to record all the transactions at the door in voice and video, the ability to talk to the door from the school and the security office miles away. And also these now can be used as a call for help stations 24/7,” says Grace.

Check Out Part 1

Article Provided By: Security

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Liquid Video Technologies Has Moved

Moved

We’ve Moved

Great news for our customers, Liquid Video Technologies has just finished moving our offices from our old home in Easley South Carolina to our new home in Greenville South Carolina. We are extremely happy to be more accessible to our clients and their ends.

Now Liquid Video Technologies is faster than ever!

With the move to our new home, we have increased our ability to serve our clients with a New Server. Also, at our new location, we have a new Fiber connection provided by Charter Spectrum and we are now running at speeds of 100 megs of upload and 100 megs of download.  In just three words, our new Server is Fast–Fast–Fast! The new Server has new SSD-hard drives and significantly more ram. Our Email clients have ready commented on just how much faster their email is running.

Our new location is, 1325 Miller Road, Suited C and we are looking forward to serving our customers from this location for years to come.

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Why is everyone covering up their laptop cameras?

Stickers and slides serve to ease concerns that spooks could be watching our every move, as even the FBI director says he puts tape on his cameras

cameras

For the past half decade, the technology industry has been racing to build better cameras into the hardware we use every day.

Yet the surveillance age has inspired an odd cottage industry battling against this trend: a glut of cheap stickers and branded plastic slides designed to cover up the front-facing cameras on phones, laptops, and even televisions.

For years, security researchers have shown that hackers can hijack the cameras to spy on whoever is on the other end. To put that in perspective, think of all the things your devices have seen you do.

Such warnings have finally caught on. Last month, the FBI director, James Comey, told an audience: “I put a piece of tape over the camera because I saw somebody smarter than I am, had a piece of tape over their camera.”

The corporate swag company Idea Stage Promotions describes its Webcam Cover 1.0 as “the HOTTEST PROMOTIONAL ITEM on the market today”. The cable channel USA Networks sent journalists a “Mr. Robot” webcam cover for the popular hacker thriller’s upcoming season.

Covering cameras isn’t new for those who know that the internet is always watching. Eva Galperin, a policy analyst for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, says that since she bought her first laptop with a built-in camera on the screen, a MacBook Pro, in 2007, she’s been covering them up.

EFF started printing its own webcam stickers in 2013, as well as selling and handing out camera stickers that read: “These removable stickers are an unhackable anti-surveillance technology.”

“People purchase these regularly,” a spokesman said.

The fear over web cameras has penetrated deep into popular culture. The trailer for Oliver Stone’s forthcoming biopic Snowden, on the US spy contractor, features a clip of actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who plays the title character, looking nervously at his laptop camera during an intimate moment with his girlfriend.

So are we all being paranoid? Well, it’s not science fiction. Researchers in 2013showed how they could activate a Macbook’s camera without triggering the green “this-thing-is-on” light. One couple claimed a hacker posted a video of them having sex after hacking their smart TV. And federal court records shows that the FBI does know how to use laptop cameras to spy on users as well.

So, naturally, where there’s fear, there is money to be made.

The DC-based CamPatch describes itself as “the Mercedes Bens [sic] of putting tape over your webcam”. Its founders started the company in 2013 after hearing a briefing from Pentagon cybersecurity experts on how webcams were a new “attack vector”, said Krystie Caraballo, CamPatch’s general manager.

Caraballo wouldn’t disclose financials other than to say the company has had “six-figure revenues for the last several years” and that it has distributed more than 250,000 patches. The company advertises bulk pricing “as low as $2.79”.

Yet not everyone is on the camera-covering bandwagon. Brian Pascal, a privacy expert who has worked for Stanford and Palantir Technologies says a cost-benefit analysis led him to conclude he’d rather have a usable camera, which he can use to record his son. But he acknowledged such stickers are a way for people signal that they too worry about Big Brother.

“Security actions without threat modelling are just performative,” said Pascal.

Others just haven’t gotten around to it yet.

“Because I’m an idiot,” replied Matthew Green, an encryption expert at Johns Hopkins University when asked why he doesn’t cover his cameras. “I have no excuse for not taking this seriously … but at the end of the day, I figure that seeing me naked would be punishment enough.”

Of course, webcam paranoia is likely to be only the first of many awakenings as consumers bring more devices into their lives that can be turned into unwitting spies. Amazon.com has had enormous success with its Echo smart speaker that, by default, is always listening for its owners’ commands. Google plans to release a similar product this year called Google Home.

In a hearing on Capitol Hill in February, the US director of national intelligence,James Clapper, acknowledged how the so-called “internet of things” could be used “for identification, surveillance, monitoring, location tracking, and targeting for recruitment, or to gain access to networks or user credentials”.

Article Provided By: theguardian

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Disney Parks, SeaWorld Orlando Announce New Security Measures

New Security Measures

For the Good of everyone, theme Parks around the country are stepping up security in response to issues of the world we now live in.

security measures

Officials at Disney theme parks in Florida and California and SeaWorld in Orlando are boosting security measures and banning toy guns to protect tourists.
Disney parks are adding metal detectors and deploying more security guards and trained dogs, the company confirms. In addition to the toy gun ban, workers are removing the items from its shops, including squirt guns, reported Fox News.

Also, guests who are 14 and older will no longer be able to wear costumes to the parks, Fox News said.  None of the parks made clear exactly how long the new security measures would last.

The increased security measures are taking effect at Walt Disney World in Orlando, as well as Disneyland and Disney California Adventure in Anaheim, California. Company officials said in a statement, “We continually review our comprehensive approach to security and are implementing additional security measures, as appropriate.”

Universal Studios was also adding metal detectors at its parks in Orlando and Hollywood, California, the Orlando Sentinel reported.

In addition, SeaWorld Orlando is boosting its security presence at the park for the holidays, officials told Fox News, adding, “Guests entering SeaWorld Orlando can also expect thorough bag checks as well as wand metal detector checks.”

None of the parks made clear exactly how long the new security procedures would last.

Article Provided By: Fox News

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Biometric – MasterCard Will Put Selfies to Work for Authentication

biometric

MasterCard on Monday announced facial recognition and fingerprint technology that essentially would allow customers to take selfies to help authenticate their identity when engaged in mobile shopping.

The rollout, which is planned for this summer in the U.S., Canada and part of Europe, follows a pilot of biometrics by MasterCard and International Card Services with Dutch participants.

The 750 ABN AMRO cardholders who took part in the pilot were able to complete their purchases without PIN codes, passwords or confirmation codes, MasterCard said. 

Ninety percent of the participants said they preferred using biometric identification over passwords, and 75 percent said they believed biometric identification decreased fraud, the company said.

“The Dutch consumer is very progressive in embracing new technologies,” said Arjan Bol, country manager for MasterCard.

The company is looking into integrating the technology into apps for banking and technology companies to make it easier to use a selfie or fingerprint for authentication.

The announcement comes days after HSBC launched a biometric rollout designed to offer a higher level of mobile protection to 15 million customers in the U.K. by the summer.

The system will allow customers to access their mobile app and telephone banking accounts through voice and fingerprint technology.

It will be expanded to the U.S., France, Canada, Mexico and Hong Kong once those governments provide regulatory approvals for the system.

Facial Recognition and Fingerprints

MasterCard last year tested facial recognition and fingerprint scanning in the U.S. with First Tech Federal Credit Union.

Under that program, employees of the credit union used artificial money and biometrics to test whether cardholders can be authenticated using fingerprint scans on smartphones or facial photographs.

The program was scheduled to run in September and October with more than 200 credit union employees. Participants made virtual donations to the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, with facial recognition and fingerprints authenticating their identity.

MasterCard and First Tech introduced the concept for that biometrics pilot at the White House Cyber Security Summit last year.

Customer Acceptance

Consumers will use the dual authentication system if they think it offers them more convenience, said Paul Teich, principal analyst at Tirias Research.

“I like the concept,” he told the E-Commerce Times. “If MasterCard can make it work quickly and unobtrusively at point of sale, then it should help drive mobile payments.”

Using two forms of authentication should drastically reduce false positives, where another person is confused with the consumer, and false negatives, where a person is unable to prove that he or she is the legitimate purchaser, Teich said.

The U.S. Global Entry system has been using a dual authentication system for about five years, he noted. Under the Customs and Border Protection program, people are authenticated using a combination of facial and fingerprint recognition and a passport optical scanner.

Financial institutions have faced challenges in the past over how to promote various payment options, while preserving security, said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

“Traditional methods are not as successful as they might be, mainly because so many consumers opt for simplistic, easy-to-remember and -crack passwords,” he told the E-Commerce Times. “Given those challenges, MasterCard’s concept of using a selfie as a second authentication factor is highly intriguing.”

Biometrics Buzz

Biometrics “is a hot topic of discussion and demonstrations” at Mobile World Congress, said Susan Schreiner, an analyst at C4 Trends, who is attending the conference in Barcelona, Spain. Retina scans and fingerprint technology are “already here and working in smartphones like the iPhone.”

Mobile World Congress producer GSMA has been working with mobile operators on its Mobile Connect platform for mobile transaction authentication. “It’s simple and as easy as tying one’s mobile identity to one’s cellphone number,” she told the E-Commerce Times.

GSMA announced at the conference “that it had reached 2 billion users — and this is just the beginning,” Schreiner said. “As we look to simplify our digital lives, passwords will surely be replaced by the next great app.”

Article Provided By: TECHNEWSWORLD

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Biometrics and the future

BiometricsThe future of Biometrics

Most respondents to Security Systems News’ latest poll said they install biometrics solutions at least occasionally, and some readers raised concerns about the technology’s cost, false acceptance rate, and security of biometric data.

Biometric solutions have barriers to overcome, according to 45 percent of respondents. “Reliability (consistency) remains a concern and, speaking for what I’ve seen in my geographic area, there still seems to be a bit of reluctance from users to have their fingerprints ‘on file,’ as well as the issue of personal hygiene due to the physical touching of a device,” Rick Zies, senior account executive, security solutions, SIEMENS Building Technologies, wrote.

Another respondent said the biggest issue “is the need for a separate database for the biometric data.”

One reader said the need to safeguard biometric templates could hinder growth in the market. “As biometric information can not be changed, like passwords can, I see a reduction in biometrics. Once the information has been stolen, there is no way to get it back or change it.”

Sixty-seven percent of poll respondents install biometrics regularly or occasionally, while the remaining 33 percent said their company does not.

Twenty percent said biometrics are best used for high security applications.

“There’s plenty of interest in biometrics amongst the uneducated,” said Mike Wilson, commercial sales engineer with Vector Security. “When I share my experiences and the cost of these systems, my customers usually change their mind. Too bad, because the advantages of a reliable and cost-effective biometric solution would be many.”

Thirty-five percent predicted that biometrics will become more prevalent.

“I believe biometrics will become standard in the coming years, as pricing goes down on readers. Currently, we are using them only at high security applications but the idea of biometrics for access will eliminate the ‘I lost my card’ syndrome,” Warren Bujol, VP of corporate security for IBERIABANK, said.

Some respondents said that biometrics can save a company money. “As our society moves away from the need to have physical items like paper money and access cards that only drive cost, we are seeing a migration away from traditional forms of security to virtual forms,” one respondent wrote.

Almost half of respondents—47 percent—said facial recognition and iris scan technologies show promise for gaining ground in the market. “Facial rec is the most sophisticated and versatile biometric. It can be used for access control, threat alerts, concierge application in retail/hospitality, law enforcement,” said another reader.

Twenty-nine percent said fingerprint technologies will continue to be the most common biometric. Twenty-four percent said they expect other biometrics to rise or believe it’s too soon to tell which biometric technology emerge as the leader in the next couple of years.

Article Provided By: Security System News

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Convenience stores not yet widely EMV compliant, lack security tools

EMV compliantEMV Compliant

Several convenience store operators admitted they were not EMV compliant during the National Association of Convenience Stores convention in Las Vegas, and said they wouldn’t be anytime soon.

Which is hard to understand seeing that the U.S. accounts for about 25 percent of the world’s credit card transactions, it accounts for a disproportionate 50 percent of all fraudulent transactions, which is why these new chip-based credit cards (also called EMV cards, short for Europay, MasterCard and Visa), are being rolled out to consumers.

Store operators also expressed difficulties acquiring the proper equipment to ensure point-to-point encryption and tokenization beyond EMV compliant – with some of them saying the companies that process their payments and POS providers either don’t offer the options or that they are offered at an additional fee, according to a report in Data Breach Today. 

Many convenience stores don’t have the same bargaining power that large retailers have to renegotiate or break contracts with processors and point-of-sale (POS) systems and service providers because their transaction volumes are low.

But smaller merchants might find some relief by contacting their acquiring banks, which might be concerned with the plight of convenience stores, for assistance to gain leverage to renegotiate contracts that include consumer protections, the report said.

Some operators said that as small business, the shift to more secure technologies would prove onerous, with some 10 percent of the nearly 100 who attended one session at the conference saying they had no plans to become compliant.

Article Provided By: SC Magazine

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