Top 10 Safety Tips For Women

Womans Safety

Safety

Have you ever felt frightened or intimidated when out walking alone? Have you ever wondered what you should do if approached by an attacker? Have you ever worried about becoming yet another home invasion statistic?

The sad reality is that we live in an increasingly violent society in which the fear of crime is ever-present. Personal safety has become an issue of importance for everyone, but especially for women. Concerned about safety and the state of affairs, Sgt. Darren Laur and his wife Beth Laur began teaching self-defence classes and safety seminars in 1993, and have since reached thousands of women. The demand they saw for reliable safety information, coupled with the need to debunk widespread myths regarding self-defence measures, convinced the two experts to write a book.

The following points are ten things that every woman should know about personal safety, and are covered in the Laurs’ newly published book, Total Awareness: A Woman’s Safety Book:

1. Awareness: Your first line of defence. Most people think of kicks to the groin and blocking punches when they hear the term “self-defence.” However, true self-defence begins long before any actual physical contact. The first, and probably most important, component in self-defence is awareness: awareness of yourself, your surroundings, and your potential attacker’s likely strategies.

The criminal’s primary strategy is to use the advantage of surprise. Studies have shown that criminals are adept at choosing targets who appear to be unaware of what is going on around them. By being aware of your surroundings and by projecting a “force presence,” many altercations which are commonplace on the street can be avoided.

2. Use your sixth sense. “Sixth sense.” “Gut instinct.” Whatever you call it, your intuition is a powerful subconscious insight into situations and people. All of us, especially women, have this gift, but very few of us pay attention to it. Learn to trust this power and use it to your full advantage. Avoid a person or a situation which does not “feel” safe–you’re probably right.

3. Self-defense training. It is important to evaluate the goals and practical usefulness of a women’s self-defense program before signing up. Here are two tips:

a) Avoid martial arts studios unless you specifically wish to train in the traditional martial arts techniques and are prepared for a long-term commitment. Many women’s self-defense programs teach watered-down martial arts techniques that are complex and unrealistic under the stress of an actual attack;

b) The self-defense program should include simulated assaults, with a fully padded instructor in realistic rape and attack scenarios, to allow you to practice what you’ve learned.

4. Escape: Always your best option. What if the unthinkable happens? You are suddenly confronted by a predator who demands that you go with him–be it in a car, or into an alley, or a building. It would seem prudent to obey, but you must never leave the primary crime scene. You are far more likely to be killed or seriously injured if you go with the predator than if you run away (even if he promises not to hurt you). Run away, yell for help, throw a rock through a store or car window–do whatever you can to attract attention. And if the criminal is after your purse or other material items, throw them one way while you run the other.

5. Your right to fight. Unfortunately, no matter how diligently we practice awareness and avoidance techniques, we may find ourselves in a physical confrontation. Whether or not you have self-defence training, and no matter what your age or physical condition, it is important to understand that you CAN and SHOULD defend yourself physically. You have both the moral and legal right to do so, even if the attacker is only threatening you and hasn’t struck first. Many women worry that they will anger the attacker and get hurt worse if they defend themselves, but statistics clearly show that your odds of survival are far greater if you do fight back. Aim for the eyes first and the groin second. Remember, though, to use the element of surprise to your advantage–strike quickly, and mean business. You may only get one chance.

6. Pepper spray: Pros and cons. Pepper spray, like other self-defence aids, can be a useful tool. However, it is important to understand that there can be significant drawbacks to its use. For example, did you know that it doesn’t work on everyone? Surprisingly, 15-20% of people will not be incapacitated even by a full-face spray. Also, if you’re carrying it in your purse, you will only waste time and alert the attacker to your intentions while you fumble for it. Never depend on any self-defence tool or weapon to stop an attacker. Trust your body and your wits, which you can always depend on in the event of an attack.

7. Home invasions: A crime on the rise. The primary way to prevent a home invasion is simply to never, ever open your door unless you either are certain you know who’s on the other side or can verify that they have a legitimate reason for being there (dressing up as a repair person or even police officer is one trick criminals use). In the event that an intruder breaks in while you’re home, you should have a safe room in your house to which you can retreat. Such a room should be equipped with a strong door, deadbolt lock, phone (preferably cell phone), and a can of pepper spray or fire extinguisher.

8. Avoiding a car-jacking. Lock all doors and keep windows up when driving. Most car-jackings take place when vehicles are stopped at intersections. The criminals approach at a 45-degree angle (in the blind spot), and either pull you out of the driver’s seat or jump in the passenger’s seat.

9. A travel tip. Violent crimes against women happen in the best and worst hotels around the world. Predators may play the part of a hotel employee, push their way through an open or unlocked door, or obtain a pass key to the room. As with home safety, never open your door unless you are certain the person on the other side is legitimate, and always carry a door wedge with you when you travel. A wedge is often stronger than the door it secures.

10. Safety in cyberspace. Although the Internet is educational and entertaining, it can also be full of danger if one isn’t careful. When communicating on-line, use a nickname and always keep personal information such as home address and phone number confidential. Instruct family members to do the same. Keep current on security issues, frauds, viruses, etc. by periodically referring to “The Police Notebook” Internet Safety Page.

Article Provided By: Power to Change

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Female Safety in Today's World4 Free Safety Apps For College Women

4 Free Safety Apps For College Women

Safety Apps

Female Safety in Today's WorldRecently, the hashtag#YesAllWomen has offered a counter-testimony to the hateful “manifesto” written by Elliott Rodger, who carried out a mass murder spree in Santa Barbara, Calif. last month.

In the manifesto, Rodger promised his revenge against all women for forcing him to live in what he called “an existence of loneliness, rejection and unfulfilled desires.”

The hashtag also countered the #NotAllMen argument, which delegitimizes the experiences of sexual assault survivors by pinning these incidents to deviant men rather than the patriarchal culture that underpins male entitlement to the female body.

Perhaps one of the most chilling #YesAllWomen tweets was the following:

Emily:

Because every single woman I know has a story about a man feeling entitled to access to her body. Every. Single. One. #YesAllWomen

The amount interest in the hashtag points to a blatant truth: Sexual assault and street harassment are far too common. But with our phones constantly glued to our hands, there are tools available that can make us safer.

These four free safety apps could help prevent sexual assault, harassment or dangerous encounters in any situation — even if you’re just walking to your car in a dark parking lot.

1. bSafe A multi-feature app designed to quell safety concerns as you travel. While the app requires you to register one primary contact, users can add an unlimited number of friends. Highlights of this safety app include a “Follow Me” feature, which enables users’ guardians or friends to track their journey in real-time using GPS technology, and an “I’m Here” feature, which alerts contacts when a user has arrived at their destination.

There is also an S.O.S. feature, and a timer feature which triggers an alarm when users do not check-in on time. A video recording begins once the alarm is activated to collect evidence of a possible crime.

2. Circle of 6 Designed specifically to combat sexual assault and interpersonal violence, this app allows users to select six friends to form a trust circle. The app uses GPS location and comes with automated messages — including “Come and get me. I need help getting home safely” and “Call and pretend you need me. I need an interruption” — to provide interference in a potentially distressing situation.

There’s also a built-in hotline, which allows users to specify the nature of their emergency.

3. Hollaback!  The pervasiveness of street harassment can make sidewalks seem like gauntlets. With cat-callers leering and, at times, groping at women, it’s easy to leave these claustrophobic spaces feeling afraid or ashamed.

Hollaback! seeks to project that shame back on street harassers. The app allows users to instantly report harassment and pinpoint exactly where it occurred. Users also have the option to upload a photo of the incident.

While Hollaback! may not have built-in alert systems like the others, it predicates on an important idea undergirding the anti-violence discussion: The importance of standing up and sharing our experiences.

4. Guardly Looking for a more discreet app? Guardly may be your go-to. This one-tap app lets users add up to 15 contacts and create separate networks based on situation or location.

With GPS technology and network failure protection, Guardly works by allowing users to send one-way alerts to their contacts in the event of an emergency. College students should sign up with Guardly using their school email address. Upon registration, Guardly will connect students with campus police if they set off an emergency alert on campus.

While users can download Guardly for free, the app does offer a premium version, which can be accessed for $1.99 a month or $19.99 a year. Added benefits of the premium version include conference call capability, private instant messaging and continuous GPS tracking during calls.

While free apps are ideal, the following apps are also be worth checking out: 1. LifeLine Response($6.99)   2. Red Panic Button ($2.99) 3. React Mobile ($1.99/month, $19.99/year)   4. StaySafe($6.99) 5. WatchOverMe ($3.99/month, $23.99/year)   6. MyForce ($11.99/month, $119.99/year)   7.OnWatch (Free 30-day trial, $2.99/month, $19.99/year)

Article Provided By: USA Today – College

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Survey Says 23% of Female College Students Experience Sexual Assault

 

 

Survey Says 23% of Female College Students Experience Sexual Assault

Sexual Assaults on College Campuses

College Sexual Assault SurveyA survey by the Association of American Universities (AAU) found that 23% of female college students have been sexually assaulted.

In additon, the survey found that overall rates of reporting to campus officials and law enforcement or others were low, ranging from five percent to 28 percent, depending on the specific type of behavior. The most common reason for not reporting incidents of sexual assault and sexual misconduct was that it was not considered serious enough. Other reasons included because they were “embarrassed, ashamed or that it would be too emotionally difficult,” and because they “did not think anything would be done about it.”

More than six in 10 student respondents (63.3 percent) believe that a report of sexual assault or sexual misconduct would be taken seriously by campus officials.

The AAU Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct was designed to assess the incidence, prevalence and characteristics of incidents of sexual assault and misconduct. It also assessed the overall campus climate with respect to perceptions of risk, knowledge of resources available to victims, and perceived reactions to an incident of sexual assault or misconduct.

The results also show:

•Nonconsensual sexual contact involving drugs and alcohol constitute a significant percentage of the incidents.

•A relatively small percentage (e.g., 28% or less) of even the most serious incidents are reported to an organization or agency (e.g., Title IX office; law enforcement)

•More than 50 percent of the victims of even the most serious incidents (e.g., forced penetration) say they do not report the event because they do not consider it “serious enough.”

•A significant percentage of students say they did not report because they were “…embarrassed, ashamed or that it would be too emotionally difficult” or “…did not think anything would be done about it.”

•Significantly more than half of the victims of nonconsensual sexual contact who reported the incident to an agency or organization said their experience with the agency or organization was very good or excellent along several criteria.

•When asked what might happen when a student reports an incident of sexual assault or misconduct to a university official, about half say that it is very or extremely likely that the university will conduct a fair investigation. The percentage is lower for those groups that are most likely to report victimization (i.e., females and those identifying as TGQN). Similar percentages are evident for opinions about other types of reactions by the university (e.g., officials would take the report seriously; protect the safety of the student; take action against the offender).

•A relatively small percentage of students believe it is very or extremely likely they will experience sexual assault or misconduct. A larger percentage of students believe that sexual assault and misconduct is very or extremely problematic for the IHE.

•A little less than half of the students have witnessed a drunk person heading for a sexual encounter. Among those who reported being a witness, most did not try to intervene.

•About a quarter of the students generally believe they are knowledgeable about the resources available related to sexual assault and misconduct.

Article Provided By: Security Magazine

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If you liked this article, you may want to read this:

Female Safety in Today's World4 Free Safety Apps For College Women