New Network Technologies To Keep An Eye On

6 Upcoming Network Technology

IoT – Internet of Things

Network

The Internet of Things, or IoT, could be one of the most sweeping technological changes of our lifetime, and it’s getting a lot of attention from analysts and the press. In a nutshell, IoT involves installing chips, sensors, and software in a wide variety of objects and then connecting those objects to the Internet. The connected objects might include home appliances, wearable devices, vehicles, thermostats, locks or even small adhesive tags that could be used to track anything.

Manufacturers have already begun rolling out smartwatches, fitness trackers and smart home devices, but this is just the first wave. Analysts suggest that by 2018, there will be 22 billion IoT devices installed. For enterprises, the IoT could represent new ways to communicate with customers, new ways to track employees, and a host of other opportunities. The challenge for IT will be finding ways to store and analyze all the data generated by these new smart devices.

Machine learning and cognitive computing

Since the dawn of the computing era, scientists have been fascinated by the idea of artificial intelligence, and today that idea is becoming reality. Several companies, including IBM, Facebook, Google, Apple and Microsoft are investing in machine learning and or cognitive computing research. These systems function more like the human brain than traditional computer systems. They are able to understand natural language, to identify and categorize the content of images and video, and to make educated guesses and hypotheses in response to questions.

IBM demonstrated the capabilities of cognitive computing when its Watson system participated in — and won — the television game show Jeopardy. Today, only 1% of developers are embedding cognitive capabilities into their apps, but by 2018, more than half of developers will likely do so.

network tech

Adaptive security

As cyberattacks against large companies continue to succeed with alarming regularity, it is becoming apparent that the existing security measures at most enterprises are inadequate to keep up with the rapidly evolving nature of attacks. Gartner recommends that organizations move to an “adaptive security” model that uses predictive analytics to anticipate where attackers will strike next.

According to Gartner, “Relying on perimeter defense and rule-based security is inadequate, especially as organizations exploit more cloud-based services and open APIs for customers and partners to integrate with their systems.” The research firm said that adaptive security will be one of the top 10 strategic technology trends for 2016 and added, “Application self-protection, as well as user and entity behavior analytics, will help fulfill the adaptive security architecture.”

Virtual/augmented reality
Several firms, notably Facebook’s Oculus Rift and Microsoft, will release virtual reality (VR) or augmented reality (AR) headsets this year. Some analysts suggest sales of these devices could top 12 million units this year.

VR and AR offer unique opportunities for consumer entertainment, particularly in regards to gaming, but some industry watchers think that VR and AR will have an even bigger impact on enterprises. Companies could use the headsets for design work, engineering, construction, training and communications. Microsoft, in particular, seems to be targeting its HoloLens augmented reality device at this market.

Cloud computing

At this point, cloud computing is hardly new, but this is one trend that isn’t going away any time soon. IDC predicts that by 2018, half of IT spending will be cloud-based. Many organizations are overcoming their security and compliance concerns and embracing the cloud wholeheartedly.

This year, analysts and vendors suggest that hybrid cloud computing models will come to the fore. Look for software makers to release a new crop of tools designed to improve cloud interoperability and automate management of the hybrid cloud.

Smart personal assistants

Consumers have grown accustomed to using voice-activated assistants like Siri or Google Now on their mobile devices, but personal assistants are moving into the enterprise. With the launch of Windows 10, Microsoft put its Cortana assistant onto desktops and laptops, and other companies are likely to follow suit.

In the coming year, analysts expect these personal assistants to get much smarter, thanks to developments in machine learning and cognitive computing. Researchers at MIT, the University of Texas at Austin, and making strides with this technology, which could find its way into enterprise products in the near future.

Article Provided By: NetworkComputing

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Celebrating Veterans Day November 11th 2016

In the United States and in other countries around the world, Veterans Day is celebrated on November 11. This day is the anniversary of the signing of the armistice, which ended the World War I hostilities between the Allied nations and Germany in 1918.

Veterans

Veterans Day honors those who served the United States in times of war.

Veterans Day – The Holiday

Veterans Day is intended to honor and thank all military personnel who served the United States in all wars, particularly living veterans. It is marked by parades and church services and in many places, the American flag is hung at half mast. A period of silence lasting two minutes may be held at 11am. Some schools are closed on Veterans Day, while others do not close, but choose to mark the occasion with special assemblies or other activities.

A Brief History

On November (the 11th month) 11th 1918, on the 11th hour, the armistice between Germany and the Allied nations came into effect. On November 11, 1919, Armistice Day was commemorated for the first time. In 1919, President Wilson proclaimed the day should be “filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory”. There were plans for parades, public meetings and a brief suspension of business activities at 11am.

Liquid Video Technologies would like to say “Thanks” to all the brave men and woman of the armed forces, Past and Present, who have served our country in times of war. Your service to the United States is an inspiration to future generations and your bravery is what helps make America the Great and Free country it is today.

THANK YOU!

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5 Emerging Data Security Technologies Set to Level The Battlefield

data security technologiesThe war between data defenders and data thieves has been described as a cat-and-mouse game. As soon as the white hats counter one form of black-hat malicious behavior, another malevolent form rears its ugly head. How can the playing field be tilted in favor of the infosec warriors? Here are five emerging security technologies that may be able to do that.


 

1. Hardware authentication

The inadequacies of usernames and passwords are well known. Clearly, a more secure form of authentication is needed. One method is to bake authentication into a user’s hardware. Intel is moving in that direction with the Authenticate solution in its new, sixth-generation Core vPro processor. It can combine a variety of hardware-enhanced factors at the same time to validate a user’s identity.

Intel has built on previous efforts to dedicate a portion of the chipset for security functions to make a device part of the authentication process. Good authentication requires three things from users: what they know, such as a password; who they are, such as a username; and what they have, such as a token. In the case of Authenticate, the device becomes the what-you-have.

“This isn’t new,” said Scott Crawford, research director for information security at 451 Research. “We’ve seen this in other manifestations, such as licensing technologies and tokens.”

Hardware authentication can be particularly important for the Internet of Things (IoT)where a network wants to ensure that the thing trying to gain access to it is something that should have access to it.

However, Crawford noted, “The most immediate application for the technology is for authenticating an endpoint in a traditional IT environment — laptops, desktops, and mobile devices using Intel chipsets.”

2. User-behavior analytics

Once someone’s username and password are compromised, whoever has them can waltz onto a network and engage in all kinds of malicious behavior. That behavior can trigger a red flag to system defenders if they’re employing user behavior analytics (UBA). The technology uses big data analytics to identify anomalous behavior by a user.

“There’s a lot of interest in this in the enterprise,” 451′s Crawford said.

“User activity is the number one concern of security professionals.”

He explained that the technology addresses a blind spot in enterprise security. “Once an attacker gains entry into an enterprise, what happens then?” he asked. “One of the first things they do is compromise credentials. So then the question becomes, Can you differentiate between a legitimate user’s activity and an attacker who has gained entry, compromised a legitimate user’s credentials and is now looking for other targets?”

Visibility into activity that does not fit the norm of the legitimate user can close a blind spot in the middle of the attack chain. “If you think of the attack chain as initial penetration, lateral movement, and then compromise, theft, and exfiltration of sensitive data, the middle links in that attack chain have not been very visible to enterprise security pros, and that’s why the interest in user behavior analytics today,” Crawford said.

Comparing a user’s present behavior to past behavior isn’t the only way UBA can identify a malicious actor. “There’s something called ‘peer analysis’,” explained Steven Grossman, vice president for program management at Bay Dynamics, a threat analytics company. “It compares how someone is behaving compared to people with the same manager or same department. That can be an indicator that the person is doing something they shouldn’t be doing or someone else has taken over their account.”

In addition, UBA can be a valuable tool for training employees in better security practices. “One of the biggest problems in a company is employees not following company policy,” Grossman said. “To be able to identify those people and mitigate that risk by training them properly is critical.”

“Users can be identified and automatically signed up for the training appropriate for the policies they were violating.”

3. Data loss prevention

A key to data loss prevention is technologies such as encryption and tokenization. They can protect data down to field and subfield level, which can benefit an enterprise in a number of ways:

  • Cyber-attackers cannot monetize data in the event of a successful breach.
  • Data can be securely moved and used across the extended enterprise — business processes and analytics can be performed on the data in its protected form, dramatically reducing exposure and risk.
  • The enterprise can be greatly aided in compliance to data privacy and security regulations for protection of payment card information (PCI), personally identifiable information (PII) and protected health information (PHI).

“There’s been a lot of security spending over the last several years, and yet the number of records breached in 2015 went up considerably over the prior year,” noted 451′s Crawford. “That’s contributing to the surge in interest in encryption.”

However, as John Pescatore, director of Emerging Security Trends at the SANS Institute, points out, authentication plays an important role in data loss prevention.

“There can’t be strong encryption without key management, and there can’t be key management without strong authentication.”

4. Deep learning

Deep learning encompasses a number of technologies, such as artificial intelligence and machine learning. “Regardless of what it’s called, there a great deal of interest in it for security purposes,” 451′s Crawford said.

Like user behavior analytics, deep learning focuses on anomalous behavior. “You want to understand where malicious behavior deviates from legitimate or acceptable behavior in terms of security,” Crawford explained.

“When you’re looking at activity on the enterprise network, there’s behavior that’s not user behavior but is still malicious. So even if it’s looking at behavior, it’s looking at a slightly different application of behavioral analytics.”

Instead of looking at users, the system looks at “entities,” explained Brad Medairy, a senior vice president with Booz Allen. “Exact business analytics and recent developments in machine-learning models mean we are now able to look at the various entities that exist across the enterprise at the micro to the macro levels. For example, a data center, as an entity, can behave a certain way, similar to a user.”

Use of machine learning can help stamp out the bane of advanced persistent threats, added Kris Lovejoy, president of Acuity Solutions, maker of an advanced malware detection platform. “With its ability to decipher between good and bad software, at line speed, machine-learning technologies will offer a significant boon to security practitioners who seek to decrease time to advanced threat detection and eradication,” she said.

Crawford said he expects investments in deep learning for security purposes to continue. He added, however, that “the challenge for enterprises is there are a lot of companies coming to market with similar approaches for the same problem. Differentiating distinctions from one vendor to another is going to be a major challenge for enterprises in the coming year and beyond.”

5. The cloud

“The cloud is going to have a transformative impact on the security technology industry generally,” Crawford said.

He explained that as more organizations use the cloud for what has traditionally been the domain of on-premises IT, more approaches to security that are born in and for the cloud will appear. On-premises techniques will be transitioned to the cloud. Things such as virtualized security hardware, virtualized firewalls, and virtualized intrusion detection and prevention systems. But that will be an intermediate stage.

“If you think about what an infrastructure-as-a-service provider can do on a very large scale for all of its customers, there may not be the need to pull out all the defenses you need on-prem,” Crawford said. “The infrastructure-as-a-service provider will build that into their platform, which will relieve the need to do that for the individual cloud customer.”

SANS’ Pescatore added that government agencies and private industry have increased the security of their data centers by using IaaS services such as Amazon and Firehost. “The GSA FedRAMP program is a great example of ‘certified secure-enough’ cloud services that make it easier for the average enterprise to have above-average data center security,” he said.

These five should help out the infosec warriors get the upperhand. Any we missed? Which technologies do you suggest will move the needle on information security? Weigh in via the comments below.

Article Provided By: TechBeacon

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WHAT IS WHOLE HOUSE AUDIO/VIDEO? Part 2

Audio/Video

Elements from the 3 methods described previously can be combined to customize the system for your requirements (eg. use a high power surround sound receiver for your home theater zone 1, add the NUVO 6-Source/6-Zone System system for the other listening areas).

The key to a successful whole-house Audio/Video system is making it possible to control the centralized equipment from each remote listening location. Without this, you will have to run back to the equipment closet everytime you want to adjust the volume or change source. With the systems below, you can use remotes in each listening location to transmit commands back to the Audio/Video equipment, just as if you were standing in front of the Audio/Video equipment. There are several ways that this can be done:

WIRELESS RF – FOR SINGLE ZONE SYSTEMS

audio/videoThe easiest and lowest cost solution is to use wireless RF control systems. This can be done using the 8210 Powermid or 8220A IR Remote Extender. These devices convert IR signals to RF that transmit through walls back to your equipment. These devices can typically only be used for single zone systems.

 

COAX VIDEO SIGNAL TRANSMISSION

If the coax video transmission system to your TVs is laid out in the same pattern as your Audio/Video zoning, you can use this same cable to transmit IR commands back to your system. You must have a coax cable system that is home run back to the Audio/Video equipment location to do this. See 8195 IR Signal Coax Splitter/Injector8197 Xtralink 2, and 7717 Multiroom Video Distribution System. This method provides zoning capability and has better signal reliability than the RF method.

 

HARDWIRED SIGNAL TRANSMISSION

This is the preferred method for new construction and retrofitting if it is possible to easily run Cable from each zone back to your equipment. Hardwired IR signal transmission provides the greatest system design flexibility and the greatest signal transmission reliability.

 

X10 AND HOME AUTOMATION CONTROL

ComputersX10 TabletopWallmount andWireless RF transmitters can also be used to control Audio/Video equipment. For a more sophisticated control that can include macros, use an intelligent home automation controller. See 1132CUP PowerLinc Controller1350 HomeVision, or 1240 JDS TimeCommander/Stargate + 1232 IR Xpander for some of the home automation controllers and software that support IR Audio/Video control.

The use of an intelligent home automation controller opens up many amazing possibilities. One touch can turn on a complex array of Audio/Video equipment. You can simplify control of your equipment so that every member of your family can easily choose the music or video source they want without juggling a handful of remotes. Or, how about having music follow you around your home (as in Bill Gates home). Motion detectors can be used to automatically turn on music in different zones.

Check Out Part 1 of What is whole house audio/video?

Article Provided By: Smarthome

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WHAT IS WHOLE HOUSE AUDIO/VIDEO?

Audio/Video

Imagine having hi-fi music in every room of your home with nothing more than an elegant Wall-Mounted Keypad and virtually invisible in-wall or in-ceiling Speakers showing. This is the dream system of interior decorators and is typically only found in multi-million dollar homes. We can show you how this can be done in your home with your existing equipment and at a reasonable cost.

audio/videoWhole house audio/video refers to a centralized audio/video system that pipes music and video/cable signals throughout the home. Because the system is centralized, the only components present in each room are speakers and TV screens. Control of the system is made through a handheld remote or wall mounted control panels. The centralized components can either be hidden away in a closet or if you prefer, mounted in an impressive Rack System array in your living room. (Some systems may have additional VCRs and CD players located locally in various rooms for convenience. If correctly configured, these VCRs and CD players can be viewed or listened to in the room they are located as well as any other room.)

There are many ways of configuring a whole-house Audio/Video system. We will describe the basic methods below. Choose the method that best suits your requirements and budget.

SINGLE AMPLIFIER/RECEIVER DRIVING SPEAKERS IN MULTIPLE ROOMS

This is the simplest and lowest cost method. The output from a single amplifier or receiver is split amongst several rooms. All rooms will receive the same music. Volume Controls can be located in each room to adjust listening levels (or a centralized volume controller can be used if preferred). Whenever the output from a single amp/receiver is split between 2 or more speakers, an impedance matching system must be used. To control the master volume and source (CD, tuner, tape, etc.) from each room an Infrared (IR) Distribution system can be added.

MULTIPLE AMPLIFIERS/RECEIVERS SHARING SOURCES

If different rooms need to listen to different sources at the same time, multiple amps/receivers are required. Use one amp/receiver for each listening (a zone refers to one or more rooms that listen to the same source simultaneously). The amp – receivers can be stacked together and the source inputs can be shared (ie. 1 CD, 1 tape, 1 DSS shared amongst 2 or more amp/receivers). To control the volume and source from each zone a zoned Infrared (IR) Distribution system can be added.

PURPOSE MADE MULTIPLE ZONE AMPLIFIER SYSTEMS

Many higher end amp/receivers now come with a built-in second discrete amplifier for a second zone. If your needs do not require more than 2 zones, this may be a cost effective solution. For a larger number of zones consider the NUVO 6-Source/6-Zone System which has six discrete amplifiers and a volume/source distribution system built-in.

Check Out Part 2 of this article.

Article Provided By: Smarthome

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The Cyber Risk of Mixing Business with Pleasure

Cyber Risk – Technical and Process Controls for the Enterprise Must Extend to Employees and How They Engage in Personal Services

Cyber RiskThe ubiquitous use of social media has blurred the lines between business and personal lives. A lot has been written about the importance of keeping the two separate, with an emphasis on the potential risk to an individual’s reputation. A photo or casual comment meant for a friend can have a detrimental effect when viewed by a business associate or employer. But there’s another important reason why separating business from pleasure should be a concern – the potential for increased cyber risk to your business stemming from credential compromise to social media accounts.

Barely a week goes by without reports of a leaked database. At the same time, dumps of stolen credentials are regularly sold, traded and shared online across paste sites, file-sharing sites and online marketplaces. Credential compromise is not new, but how these credentials become available is often directly related to the lack of separation between business and pleasure.
The LinkedIn and MySpace databases were recently exposed by threat actors using the names “Peace of Mind” and “Tessa88”. Breaches of dating services like Ashley Madison and Adult Friend Finder also were the source for credentials. And although proportionally low, even gaming services have been responsible for leaked credentials. It may be surprising but many of the credentials used for these sites were corporate accounts. That’s right. Many employees reuse their corporate emails for other services and, when these services are breached, it also reveals their credentials.

Cyber Risk

Employees who have reused corporate emails and passwords for personal use can put their employers at risk of account takeovers, credential stuffing and extortion attempts.
Account takeovers
On May 23, 2016, OurMine Team reportedly compromised a number of social media profiles for various business personnel and celebrities. The accounts that were affected included Twitter, Tumblr and LinkedIn profiles. The group initially claimed the use of zero-day exploits to compromise accounts, but later confirmed access was secured through the use of information from the recently exposed dataset from LinkedIn. More recently, it was reported that the alleged Dropbox leak also occurred from password reuse of the LinkedIn breach. The likelihood is that people have neglected to change their passwords since 2012, and proceeded to recycle the same password for multiple services.
Credential stuffing
Threat actors can automatically inject breached username and password pairs in order to fraudulently gain access to user accounts. This technique, known as credential stuffing, is a type of brute force attack whereby large sets of credentials are automatically inputted into websites until a match with an existing account is found. An attacker can then hijack that account for a variety of purposes, such as draining stolen accounts of funds, the theft of personally identifiable information, or to send spam. According to the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), credential stuffing is one of the most common techniques used to take-over user accounts.

Extortion attempts
Hundreds of thousands of corporate email addresses were leaked as part of the Ashley Madison breach. Following the breach of online dating site Ashley Madison in July 2015, extortion attempts were directed against specific individuals identified within the compromised dataset. Users received extortion emails threatening to share the exposed information with the victim’s partner, unless one Bitcoin was paid into a specified Bitcoin wallet. A number of automated post-breach extortion services also emerged including one site that reportedly spammed users with unsolicited bulk emails that suggested their spouses or employers may find out their details were exposed.
By better understanding that corporate credentials are being reused for personal services and how threat actors may exploit credentials, security teams can better prepare for and mitigate instances of credential compromise. Here are a few tips.
Set policies

• Establish a policy for which external services are allowed to be associated to corporate email accounts.
• Understand and monitor approved external services for password policies and formats to understand the risks and lowest common denominators.
Monitor activity

• Proactively monitor for credential dumps relevant to your organization’s accounts and evaluate these dumps to determine if the dumps are new or have been previously leaked, in which case you may have already addressed the matter.
 • If you have any user behavior analytics capabilities, import compromised identity information and look for any suspicious activity (e.g., accessing resources that have not been accessed in the past.)
Educate employees

• Update security awareness training to include the risks associated with password reuse.
• Encourage staff to use consumer password management tools like 1Password or LastPass to also manage personal account credentials.
The number of compromised credentials that are available online is staggering, providing a goldmine for attackers. In fact, Verizon’s 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report found that breached credentials were responsible for 63 percent of data breaches. As the lines between personal and professional become blurred, so too must the approach that organizations take to deal with cyber risk. Technical and process controls for the enterprise must extend to employees and how they engage in personal services.
Article Provided By: SecurityWeek

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Canary Flex is a small, weatherproof security camera

Canary Flex

Canary Flex

Security cameras are slowly making their way out of your house and onto your porches and yards. Canary Flex is following the footsteps of rival Nest by launching a new, smaller weatherproof camera called the Flex that can be plugged into an outlet or powered by batteries. It’s available for pre-order today for $199 and will be in stores by the holidays. Canary is also introducing a new pricing model that is pretty different from what’s on the market, but we’ll get to that in a bit.

Rated IP65, the Canary Flex can withstand splashes of water, and thanks to the included weatherproof cord, it can remain plugged in even when it’s wet. If you’d like to go wireless, you can use the bundled rechargeable battery, which should last two to three months of average use, the company said. When it’s running on batteries, the Flex runs on a low power WiFi state to stay connected to the servers without sucking up juice, and also uses a passive infrared (PIR) sensor to detect incidents before triggering the rest of the system. Otherwise, the Flex uses the camera (or “computer vision,” as Canary called it) to monitor activity when plugged in. When triggered, the Canary Flex will record HD video to the cloud.

Unlike its predecessor, the Canary Flex is compact, and fits comfortably in your hand so you can easily move it around should you need to. It also has a magnetic base that lets it swivel 360 degrees in its companion mount. However, you’ll lack the siren that the original camera had, as well as what Canary called the home health sensors. The latter relay feedback on your house’s temperature, humidity and air quality. Those who already own the older Canary camera can use the same app with the new device, and no hub is required.

To make it easier to place the Flex around your house, Canary is also launching a series of accessories, such as a secure mount, a stake mount to stick your camera in your flower pot, and a fun twist mount to wrap your Flex around almost anything.

For those who want complete peace of mind, Canary  is also launching a 4G LTE mount with Verizon that will let your Flex switch to cellular data in the event that your WiFi network drops out. The 4G mount can be plugged in, but also has enough onboard battery to last as long as the Flex’s power pack will. This would be great for those who want to prepare for power outages. It’ll be available shortly after the Flex hits store shelves.

One of the coolest things about this launch is Canary Flex ‘s new pricing model that does away with the industry’s conventional tiers system altogether. Instead of making you pay more to store more of your footage like competitors do, Canary is letting you access the last 24 hours of your timeline for free. That’s twice the 12 hours it previously let nonpaying customers have.

The company is also removing its previous limits on features such as saving and downloading clips, as well as sending them to other contacts. Those who want more support can pay $9.99 a month for one device ($15 for two to three cameras), and that membership will come with up to $1,000 in homeowners deductible reimbursement (for qualifying incidents), as well as dedicated agents who will follow you through your your incident report process. Members also get extended warranties and access to footage from the prior 30 days.

That’s quite a big bump from the free version, and could give Canary Flex a serious edge over its competitors. Both Nest and Canary’s devices cost $199, but the latter says it is working on a more personable approach to security that could make its outgoing alerts more meaningful. Some of these upcoming improvements include refined object, people and animal recognition, as well as better understanding of new versus repetitive motions. These changes will soon roll out to the Canary app as well. In the meantime, you may want to finetune your security camera settings so you’re not getting buzzed for every time your neighbor’s dog jumps, or for random tree branches smacking against your window.

Article Provided By: engadget

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Drones Doing Bad; Drones Doing Good (Part 2)

Drones

Drones (continued) – Innovative User-Defined Fields

According to Wydner, the system, which was installed by security systems integrator Steve Murphy of Chown Security, Portland, Oregon, had to not only work with existing HID Global identification cards used by students across campus; it also had to have an easy-to-access user repository. “A key feature that really helped us was the ability to add in user-defined fields because we needed to have our own unique key,” Wydner says.

The innovative charm of the access system’s technology, however, is its hand- shaking with other software platforms for a completely interoperable access and room reservation system. To accomplish this, Wydner and his team installed the data management engine (Pinwheel DME from SwiftData Technology). Pinwheel integrates data from the access system along with several other enterprise software solutions employed at the facility, including sophisticated room scheduling, Web calendar and online event registration software (from Dean Evans & Associates) and an enterprise resource planning platform from higher education software provider Ellucian.

However, there were several significant hurdles that had to be overcome by both the OSU IT group and others involved to help make these interoperability goals a reality. An integration of this magnitude had never been done before, so much of the project was uncharted water, comments Murphy. “We didn’t know quite where to begin,” Wydner adds. “We knew that we needed to get all of the user data – our faculty, staff members, and students. We needed some way of defining who is taking a college business class and which system we were going to pull that out of, whether that’s going to be our central student repository, Active Directory or if we were going to go off of Salesforce.”

Wydner said the university eventually decided the best way to bring this information together was to enter it into Salesforce, the San Francisco, California-based firm known for its Web customer relationship management system and its strength in application programming interfaces or APIs. He started a separate project focused on integrating the identification numbers from the campus HID cards into their Salesforce database. Aside from that, the team also had to figure out a way to format the data from Salesforce so that it would be recognized by the access and Dean Evans event management software solutions.

By using the Pinwheel data management engine or DME platform, students are now enrolled automatically based upon the information entered into the Ellucian enterprise resource planning system. The successful integration of these systems would not have been possible, however, without some of the unique features provided by the access control platform with its innovative way of combining the access levels of students and staff members with their respective rights and privileges through a process known as nesting.

Austin Hall also uses an automated lock system which saved significantly on time and manpower.

Door Access and Meeting Scheduling

“The main thing that our faculty and students enjoy about the integration is that they can just walk up to a project room or a meeting room [and] tap their OSU ID on the lock (AD-400 wireless networked locks from Schlage). It then opens up, lets them in, and it also gives them an automatic one-hour reservation on the room,” observes Wydner.

“Multi-tech locks are future-proof and access panels can handle up to 16 locks,” points out Murphy, who believes the project took system integration capabilities to new and innovative heights.

There are other tech trends embedded in such an approach, according to Mitchell Kane, president, Vanderbilt. As compared to security video, it may seem that advances in electronic access control emerge and evolve more slowly. From a hardware perspective, technology moves at a snail’s pace, says Kane. What is more innovatively important is the trend of interoperability with other systems and big data. Until recently, most data integration with access management was through HR or IT databases. Kane sees a trend toward integration with workflow applications, working with data on an automated level, based on logic and analytics.

The multifunctional ability can be viewed as innovative.

That’s the bottom line for Guy Grace, manager of security and emergency planning for the Littleton, Colorado, Public Schools, and who is installing a network-based communication and security system (the IX Series from Aiphone) featuring video entry security, internal communication, emergency stations, and paging. All units and apps in the systems can unlock doors remotely on a network, assist onsite visitors from an offsite location, broadcast emergency announcements and communicate using Power over Ethernet (PoE).

Among the “cool things we get from the technology is the intercom’s ability to record audio and video of visitors on our network digital video recorders or NDVRs. So now we have an extra camera, the ability to record all the transactions at the door in voice and video, the ability to talk to the door from the school and the security office miles away. And also these now can be used as a call for help stations 24/7,” says Grace.

Check Out Part 1

Article Provided By: Security

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

Drones Doing Bad; Drones Doing Good (Part 1)

Drones

Drones Good or Bad?

A growing number of utilities, ports and stadiums though are concerned about the dark side of drones. For example, some security operations are using or considering small radar technology to alert to drone intrusions. And drones have intruded into sports stadiums and parades, peeked into windows and landed on the White House lawn.

On the other hand, experts at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business say drones are already into law enforcement and security applications. “We are missing out on a commercial opportunity that other countries have already embraced,” says Smith School professor Oliver Schlake, a drone hobbyist who challenges his MBA students to develop business applications for the technology. Hank Lucas, another Smith School professor who wrote “The Search for Survival: Lessons from Disruptive Technologies,” says the impact will be immense as more companies discover commercially viable applications for drones. “It’s well beyond our imagination,” he says.

Storm watching:Drones can fly into the eye of a hurricane or hover over an active volcano, sending back data without risking lives. Global Hawk drones developed by Northrop Grumman can monitor stormy areas for up to 30 hours, generating data not available any other way.

Search and rescue:After severe storms hit Texas and Oklahoma in May 2015, the FAA sent drones from one of its test sites to search for survivors along the Blanco River.

Security:Drones equipped with headlamps, cameras and alarms can startle intruders and records their movements – and they often can arrive at the scene faster than police or private security officers. A company with commercial security contracts in New Zealand plans to deploy the technology by the end of 2015.

Innovation and technology as applied to the security industry can, not surprisingly, be a two-edged sword. Still, the good side of that tech sword can slice through crime prevention, situational awareness, forensics and other security tasks with ease.

One example: Innovative integration through diverse software is squeezing more value out of enterprise investments in security technology that evolves from protection and into the natural workflow of an organization.

At Austin Hall in the College of Business at Oregon State University in Corvallis, a security management system (VI Connect from Vanderbilt) represents one of the most unique systems integration projects within the higher education market.

The technology seamlessly integrates building access control into a single data management solution that not only enables school officials to streamline door access, but also allows students and staff to reserve one of 21 project rooms in the facility simply by using their existing credential. In addition to the project rooms, the building also features classrooms, faculty conference rooms, IT closets, a four-room research suite, a mailroom and an assortment of event spaces.

To help manage access control at Austin Hall, which includes credentials for approximately 4,500 students each semester, Kirk Wydner, operating systems network analyst for the College of Business, and his team chose to take an innovative and integrated approach.

Part 2, Next Week

Article Provided By: Security

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com

Liquid Video Technologies Has Moved

Moved

We’ve Moved

Great news for our customers, Liquid Video Technologies has just finished moving our offices from our old home in Easley South Carolina to our new home in Greenville South Carolina. We are extremely happy to be more accessible to our clients and their ends.

Now Liquid Video Technologies is faster than ever!

With the move to our new home, we have increased our ability to serve our clients with a New Server. Also, at our new location, we have a new Fiber connection provided by Charter Spectrum and we are now running at speeds of 100 megs of upload and 100 megs of download.  In just three words, our new Server is Fast–Fast–Fast! The new Server has new SSD-hard drives and significantly more ram. Our Email clients have ready commented on just how much faster their email is running.

Our new location is, 1325 Miller Road, Suited C and we are looking forward to serving our customers from this location for years to come.

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com