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High Tech Without Answers

High Tech Without Answers

Boeing will cut production of its 737 Max plane amid growing international crisis

 

Boeing plans to cut the rate of its 737 production to 42 airplanes per month from 52 as it works to manage the grounding of its MAX aircraft in the wake of two deadly crashes, Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg said in a statement on Friday.

Muilenburg said the company now knows that a chain of events caused Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents, with erroneous activation of so-called MCAS anti-stall software “a common link” between the two.

The company continues to make progress on a 737 MAX software update to prevent “accidents like these from ever happening again,” he said.

As we work closely with customers and global regulators to return the 737 MAX to service, we continue to be driven by our enduring values, with a focus on safety, integrity and quality in all we do.

We now know that the recent Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accidents were caused by a chain of events, with a common chain link being erroneous activation of the aircraft’s MCAS function. We have the responsibility to eliminate this risk, and we know how to do it. As part of this effort, we’re making progress on the 737 MAX software update that will prevent accidents like these from ever happening again. Teams are working tirelessly, advancing and testing the software, conducting non-advocate reviews, and engaging regulators and customers worldwide as we proceed to final certification. I recently had the opportunity to experience the software update performing safely in action during a 737 MAX 7 demo flight. We’re also finalizing new pilot training courses and supplementary educational material for our global MAX customers. This progress is the result of our comprehensive, disciplined approach and taking the time necessary to get it right.

As we continue to work through these steps, we’re adjusting the 737 production system temporarily to accommodate the pause in MAX deliveries, allowing us to prioritize additional resources to focus on software certification and returning the MAX to flight. We have decided to temporarily move from a production rate of 52 airplanes per month to 42 airplanes per month starting in mid-April.

At a production rate of 42 airplanes per month, the 737 program and related production teams will maintain their current employment levels while we continue to invest in the broader health and quality of our production system and supply chain.

We are coordinating closely with our customers as we work through plans to mitigate the impact of this adjustment. We will also work directly with our suppliers on their production plans to minimize operational disruption and financial impact of the production rate change.

In light of our commitment to continuous improvement and our determination to always make a safe industry even safer, I’ve asked the Boeing Board of Directors to establish a committee to review our company-wide policies and processes for the design and development of the airplanes we build. The committee will confirm the effectiveness of our policies and processes for assuring the highest level of safety on the 737-MAX program, as well as our other airplane programs, and recommend improvements to our policies and procedures.

The committee members will be Adm. Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr., (Ret.), former vice chairman, U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, who will serve as the committee’s chair; Robert A. Bradway, chairman and CEO of Amgen, Inc.; Lynn J. Good, chairman, president and CEO of the Duke Energy Corporation; and Edward M. Liddy, former chairman and CEO of the Allstate Corporation, all members of the company’s board. These individuals have been selected to serve on this committee because of their collective and extensive experiences that include leadership roles in corporate, regulated industries and government entities where safety and the safety of lives is paramount.

Safety is our responsibility, and we own it. When the MAX returns to the skies, we’ve promised our airline customers and their passengers and crews that it will be as safe as any airplane ever to fly. Our continued disciplined approach is the right decision for our employees, customers, supplier partners and other stakeholders as we work with global regulators and customers to return the 737 MAX fleet to service and deliver on our commitments to all of our stakeholders.

(Reporting by Tracy Rucinski; editing by Grant McCool)

More on Boeing’s 737 Max crisis:

BY: Tracy Rucinski

 

Liquid Video Technologies Logo, Security, Video Surveillance, Greenville South Carolina

 

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home SecuritySystem, Networking, Access ControlFire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com.

IoT And Your Digital Supply Chain

IoT And Your Digital Supply Chain

IoT And Your Digital Supply Chain

“Money, it’s a gas. Grab that cash with both hands and make a stash”, Pink Floyd is always near and dear to my heart. No doubt the theme song to a lot of producers of devices that fall into the category of Internet of Things or IoT.

I can’t help but to giggle at the image that comes to mind when I think about IoT manufacturers. I have this vision in my head of a wild-eyed prospector jumping around after finding a nugget of gold the size of a child’s tooth. While this imagery may cause some giggles it also gives me pause when I worry about what these gold miners are forgetting. Security comes to mind.

I know, I was shocked myself. Who saw that coming?

While there is a mad rush to stake claims across the Internet for things like connected toasters, coffee makers and adult toys it seems security falls by the way side. A lot of mistakes that were made a corrected along the way as the Internet evolved into the monster that it is today are returning. IoT appears to be following a similar trajectory but, at a far faster pace.

With this pace we see mistakes like IoT devices being rolled out with deprecated libraries and zero ability to upgraded their firmware or core software. But, no one really seems to care as they count their money while they’re still sitting at the table. The problem really comes into focus when we realize that it is the rest of us that will be left holding the bag after these manufacturers have made their money and run.

Of further concern is the fractured digital supply chains that they are relying on. I’m worried that with this dizzying pace of manufacture that miscreants and negative actors are inserting themselves into the supply chain. We have seen issues like this come to the forefront time and again. Why is it that we seem hell bent on reliving the same mistakes all over again?

One of my favorite drums to pound on is the use of deprecated, known vulnerable, libraries in their code. I’ve watched talks from numerous presenters who unearthed this sort of behavior at a fairly consistent pace. What possible rationale could there be for deploying an IoT device in 2016 with an SSL library that is vulnerable to Heartbleed?

I’ll let that sink in for a moment.

And this is by no means the worst of the lot. These products are being shipped to market with preloaded security vulnerabilities that can lead to all manner of issues. Data theft is the one that people like to carry on about a fair bit but, it would be a fairly trivial exercise to compromise some of these devices and have them added to a DDoS botnet.

What type of code review is being done a lot the way by code written by outsourced third parties? This happens a lot and really does open a company up to a risk of malicious, or poor, code being introduced.

The IoT gold rush is a concern for me from a security perspective. Various analyst firms gush about the prospect of having 800 gajillion Internet enabled devices online by next Tuesday but, they never talk about how we are going to clean up the mess later on. Someone always has to put the chairs up after the party is over.

 

IoT And Your Digital Supply Chain By:  Dave Lewis

 

Liquid Video Technologies Logo, Security, Video Surveillance, Greenville South Carolina

 

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home SecuritySystem, Networking, Access ControlFire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com.

Light-Blub Innovision, Greenville, South Carolina

Computer Hacking Liability – Are You At Risk?

Innovision logo, Liquid Video Technologies, Greenville, South Carolina

Presented by McNair Law Firm, P.A.

Please join us for the
InnoVision Forum:

Computer Hacking Liability – Are You At Risk?
What To Do To Avoid Data Breaches and Hacking and
What To Do If You are Hacked

From the US Government to the State of South Carolina, companies and organizations of all sizes are under attack from Computer Hacking. The threat of these attacks has escalated so that cyber security professionals admit it is almost impossible to achieve 100% prevention.  According to Verizon’s 2011 report, small and medium sized businesses, as well as governments and municipalities, are the main targets.  Please join us to discuss the legal liability associated with hacking for you and your company, leading edge prevention measures to avoid hacking, and what your obligations are in the event that a breach is suspected or discovered.  We will also discuss the role of the financial institution in these circumstances.

PANEL INCLUDES:

Douglas W. Kim
Attorney
McNair Law Firm, P.A.

 

  • Doug will discuss the current laws concerning security requirements including the Red Flag Rules, PCI Compliance, South Carolina specific laws and recent cases involving hacking.  His discussion will include the recent case where a bank was required to repay monies lost to a customer due to hackers ($345,000.00).

Frank Mobley
Founder and CEO
Immedion, LLC

 

  • Frank will discuss current IT security risks and the prevalence and method of hacking.  He will also include information on how you can better protect your organization against illicit and illegal attempts to garner private information.

Deveren Werne
Founder of Mojoe.net and
Principal of Liquid Video Technologies, Inc.

 

  • Deveren will explain PCI compliance for businesses such as why a business should be PCI compliant and, if not, what are the repercussions of not being compliant, and what a business should do to become compliant from hardware to software perspective.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Presentations ~ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm Networking
Location – McNair Law Firm, P.A., Poinsett Plaza, Suite 700, 104 S. Main Street, Greenville, SC

Seating is limited, so please respond early

RSVP to Kathy Ham by email: kham@mcnair.net or by phone: (864) 552-9345

Founding Sponsor:

Deloitte Founding Sponsor of InnoVision Awards

www.innovisionawards.org
Celebrating excellence. Honoring distinction. Applauding innovation.

Liquid Video Technologies Logo, Security, Video Surveillance, Greenville South Carolina

If you would like liquidvideotechnologies.com to discuss developing your Home Security System, Networking, Access Control, Fire, IT consultant or PCI Compliance, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-859-9848 or you can email us at deveren@liquidvideotechnologies.com